30 December 2004

E-feed, Yahoo to Blogger: Deselecting ~publish~ in blogger e-mail settings

Overview

This blog entry discusses:

  • e-feeds, or e-mail forwarded from an e-mail account to a blog-host;
  • a nuance with the blogger publish under e-mail to blogger; and
  • a concept on integrating irregular images and e-feed content into a blog-host

    Discussion

    E-feed is a name for E-mail that is forwarded to a blog. Blogger allows users to forward e-mail using a special e-mail extension.


    "Blogger settings" permit users to select "publish". This enables users to have their e-feed automatically published.

    However, if you deselect publish, you'll still have you e-feed posted to your blog. The only difference is that it will not publish or be visible.

    The status will change once you go to edit and then close-out: After you have edited, you either can save it as draft or publish. There's no middle ground.

    In other words, even though your e-feed hasn't published, it's still listed as "non-draft" in blogger.

    It won't report or list as green, but appear to be a published document; that is, until you check with "view". This is to say that the link you select to "view" the unpublished e-feed will appear as valid, will not appear as draft.

    However, the message you will get is:
    The requested URL was not found on this server Ref
    Even though the link reports as invalid, it's actually a valid e-feed. You, as the blogger, can still see the blog-entry in your "edit posts". The blog entry forwarded from your e-mail account is still there, appears as published [non-draft, non-green]

  • E-mail to blogger with images

    There's one caveat to e-feed: Know whether your blogging platform can integrate the images. Blogger says,

    Mail-to-Blogger does not yet work with image attachments
    It's a misnomer that you cannot send images with e-feed. In practice, the images still get posted, they just make a mess of your blog.

    This is the e-feed which discusses the solution:


    E-feed Integration

    Summary: This is a copy of the e-mail which did not publish, but is posted. This comment outlines a concept of allowing a blog-host like blogger adjust an e-feed input so that the images can post. The goal is to let the receiving platform, like a browser, adjust the incoming datastream so that it remains viewable.

    Information

    Concept: Content adjustment based on recipient platform.

    Did you notice the Yahoo-image forwarded to blogger? Notice how it bleeds through.

    One solution would be to permit the receiving host [in this case blogger] adjust the input data in the XML feed.

    This is not to say that feeds would be adjusted, changed. Rather, for formatting purposes it would be good if a given host could adjust input data so that it remained readable.

    In this case, an ideal approach would be for blogger to read the XML-input from Yahoo e-feed, and choose from various Yahoo-option-images those images that would "better fit" the blogger index.

    Rather than accept an image that would be "too big" and "make the index shift," an ideal approach would be to allow blogger to override those variables that would cause a known problem and still retain essentially the same effect.

    Images could be sized smaller, or alternative images could be placed into the blog.

    Summary

    XML feeds include e-feed, or e-mail forwarded from an e-mail service like Yahoo and automatically posted to blogger.

    Content could be adjusted to ensure the input content did not disrupt the final blog-host.

    Concept: Content adjustment based on recipient platform

    Parameters, requirements:

    - Reposition, resize images in Yahoo when set to blogger

    - Blogger [or receiving host of the e-feed] would automatically choose [if the user decided to do so] among input variables: Image size, layout, wrap around.

    - Allow recipient to reformat content to facilitate integration without any impact to the other content in the accepting-location.

    - Feeds could include auto-commands like <DIV> to ensure wraparound at the appropriate place, avoid creating extended text, and ensure that line entries fit within the constraints of the platform [and do not bleed over, thereby shifting the index]

    Analogy: Web browsers can do the same thing for webpages: Take any webpage, adjust the content parameters like language and font style so that they are automatically adjusted to meet the ~user's~ requirements.


    Next

    It remains to be seen what happens to the e-feed once we publish this blog spot, or republish the entire blog. The "non-published" blog could very well be published and appear.

    Stay tuned.

    Update

    The "non-published" blog entry now appears. Rather than posting with a date that it arrived into the blog, the e-feed publishes and gets indexed on the day that it was manually-published.

    In other words, once the user deselects "publish," the e-feed will still arrive in the queue. It appears as though it is published, but when choosing "view," it will not appear until edited and then published, or saved as a draft.

    In order to prevent an e-feed from publishing, have to do two things:

    - Deslecte publish
    - Then save the e-feed as draft

    Then you'll be ready to post other blog-entries.
  • Overview

    This blog entry discusses:

  • e-feeds, or e-mail forwarded from an e-mail account to a blog-host;
  • a nuance with the blogger publish under e-mail to blogger; and
  • a concept on integrating irregular images and e-feed content into a blog-host

    Discussion

    E-feed is a name for E-mail that is forwarded to a blog. Blogger allows users to forward e-mail using a special e-mail extension.


    "Blogger settings" permit users to select "publish". This enables users to have their e-feed automatically published.

    However, if you deselect publish, you'll still have you e-feed posted to your blog. The only difference is that it will not publish or be visible.

    The status will change once you go to edit and then close-out: After you have edited, you either can save it as draft or publish. There's no middle ground.

    In other words, even though your e-feed hasn't published, it's still listed as "non-draft" in blogger.

    It won't report or list as green, but appear to be a published document; that is, until you check with "view". This is to say that the link you select to "view" the unpublished e-feed will appear as valid, will not appear as draft.

    However, the message you will get is:
    The requested URL was not found on this server Ref
    Even though the link reports as invalid, it's actually a valid e-feed. You, as the blogger, can still see the blog-entry in your "edit posts". The blog entry forwarded from your e-mail account is still there, appears as published [non-draft, non-green]

  • E-mail to blogger with images

    There's one caveat to e-feed: Know whether your blogging platform can integrate the images. Blogger says,

    Mail-to-Blogger does not yet work with image attachments
    It's a misnomer that you cannot send images with e-feed. In practice, the images still get posted, they just make a mess of your blog.

    This is the e-feed which discusses the solution:


    E-feed Integration

    Summary: This is a copy of the e-mail which did not publish, but is posted. This comment outlines a concept of allowing a blog-host like blogger adjust an e-feed input so that the images can post. The goal is to let the receiving platform, like a browser, adjust the incoming datastream so that it remains viewable.

    Information

    Concept: Content adjustment based on recipient platform.

    Did you notice the Yahoo-image forwarded to blogger? Notice how it bleeds through.

    One solution would be to permit the receiving host [in this case blogger] adjust the input data in the XML feed.

    This is not to say that feeds would be adjusted, changed. Rather, for formatting purposes it would be good if a given host could adjust input data so that it remained readable.

    In this case, an ideal approach would be for blogger to read the XML-input from Yahoo e-feed, and choose from various Yahoo-option-images those images that would "better fit" the blogger index.

    Rather than accept an image that would be "too big" and "make the index shift," an ideal approach would be to allow blogger to override those variables that would cause a known problem and still retain essentially the same effect.

    Images could be sized smaller, or alternative images could be placed into the blog.

    Summary

    XML feeds include e-feed, or e-mail forwarded from an e-mail service like Yahoo and automatically posted to blogger.

    Content could be adjusted to ensure the input content did not disrupt the final blog-host.

    Concept: Content adjustment based on recipient platform

    Parameters, requirements:

    - Reposition, resize images in Yahoo when set to blogger

    - Blogger [or receiving host of the e-feed] would automatically choose [if the user decided to do so] among input variables: Image size, layout, wrap around.

    - Allow recipient to reformat content to facilitate integration without any impact to the other content in the accepting-location.

    - Feeds could include auto-commands like <DIV> to ensure wraparound at the appropriate place, avoid creating extended text, and ensure that line entries fit within the constraints of the platform [and do not bleed over, thereby shifting the index]

    Analogy: Web browsers can do the same thing for webpages: Take any webpage, adjust the content parameters like language and font style so that they are automatically adjusted to meet the ~user's~ requirements.


    Next

    It remains to be seen what happens to the e-feed once we publish this blog spot, or republish the entire blog. The "non-published" blog could very well be published and appear.

    Stay tuned.

    Update

    The "non-published" blog entry now appears. Rather than posting with a date that it arrived into the blog, the e-feed publishes and gets indexed on the day that it was manually-published.

    In other words, once the user deselects "publish," the e-feed will still arrive in the queue. It appears as though it is published, but when choosing "view," it will not appear until edited and then published, or saved as a draft.

    In order to prevent an e-feed from publishing, have to do two things:

    - Deslecte publish
    - Then save the e-feed as draft

    Then you'll be ready to post other blog-entries.
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