23 December 2004

Feed integration: Increasing personal spending efficiency

Think of your credit card. All that information.

These days, people seem to think that credit card information is a bad thing. In the wrong hands, indeed.

But if the consumer had tools to analyze their own spending habits, their view might change.

I'm not talking about spending or budget plans like Quicken. But a tool that will graphically display where you spend your money on a map.

There are tools called linear programming which allow major distributors like DHL and FedEx to analyze their transportation route and connect the greatest number of delivery points in a single route. Why not have the same for consumers?

For those worried about privacy, this could be an opt-in program.

XML feeds along your route

Consumers could apply the same theory to their credit card spending. Imagine getting a visual image of where you physically travel using your credit card, then having an XML tool that will analyze your route and offer more efficient ways to travel

Also, the XML integration tool could also identify your spending habits, find similar products along your route, and point you to websites with coupons and sales.

Purchase feeds

Better yet, plug in your potential purchases, have the XML integrator identify those feeds which match you desired purchases, and then automatically plot-out the route to most efficiently purchase the greatest number of items. This avoids spending alot of money on gas and car maintenance for something that has only a marginal cost savings.

Another way of using this integration system would be to also take your ongoing purchase patterns [groceries, gas, entertainment, restaurants], identify the point in time the sales will occur, and then have your integrator identify XML-feed-alternatives along the route to keep you up to date on changes in sales.

Not just today, but time those feeds so that they dovetail when you plan to take action. Think of it as calendarizing your feeds. Giving you a specific feed when you need it, not just when someone decides you need to have it.

And why not include the menus for your favorite restaurant in that XML feed.

Google could return automatic feed results linked with products and purchase patterns. And you could also have maintenance, wearout and product warranty information included so that you would get automatic XML feeds when you reach your deadlines for the 60,000 mile inspection.

Vacation planning

Also, imagine you're planning a vacation. Why not have Google set up so that it integrates your known purchase patterns, and then while you are traveling you get XML-feeds related to things of internet along your route.

Suppose you were to lose your credit card. Why not have a quick way to identify where you can pick-up the replacement card, and then continue along your vacation route, and still enjoy the scenes along the way.

Sure, you may have to leave your desired route to get your replacement card, but at least you'll know along the way that you'll have XML feeds supplying you with information that will point out that interesting monastery you would have otherwise not known existed.
Think of your credit card. All that information.

These days, people seem to think that credit card information is a bad thing. In the wrong hands, indeed.

But if the consumer had tools to analyze their own spending habits, their view might change.

I'm not talking about spending or budget plans like Quicken. But a tool that will graphically display where you spend your money on a map.

There are tools called linear programming which allow major distributors like DHL and FedEx to analyze their transportation route and connect the greatest number of delivery points in a single route. Why not have the same for consumers?

For those worried about privacy, this could be an opt-in program.

XML feeds along your route

Consumers could apply the same theory to their credit card spending. Imagine getting a visual image of where you physically travel using your credit card, then having an XML tool that will analyze your route and offer more efficient ways to travel

Also, the XML integration tool could also identify your spending habits, find similar products along your route, and point you to websites with coupons and sales.

Purchase feeds

Better yet, plug in your potential purchases, have the XML integrator identify those feeds which match you desired purchases, and then automatically plot-out the route to most efficiently purchase the greatest number of items. This avoids spending alot of money on gas and car maintenance for something that has only a marginal cost savings.

Another way of using this integration system would be to also take your ongoing purchase patterns [groceries, gas, entertainment, restaurants], identify the point in time the sales will occur, and then have your integrator identify XML-feed-alternatives along the route to keep you up to date on changes in sales.

Not just today, but time those feeds so that they dovetail when you plan to take action. Think of it as calendarizing your feeds. Giving you a specific feed when you need it, not just when someone decides you need to have it.

And why not include the menus for your favorite restaurant in that XML feed.

Google could return automatic feed results linked with products and purchase patterns. And you could also have maintenance, wearout and product warranty information included so that you would get automatic XML feeds when you reach your deadlines for the 60,000 mile inspection.

Vacation planning

Also, imagine you're planning a vacation. Why not have Google set up so that it integrates your known purchase patterns, and then while you are traveling you get XML-feeds related to things of internet along your route.

Suppose you were to lose your credit card. Why not have a quick way to identify where you can pick-up the replacement card, and then continue along your vacation route, and still enjoy the scenes along the way.

Sure, you may have to leave your desired route to get your replacement card, but at least you'll know along the way that you'll have XML feeds supplying you with information that will point out that interesting monastery you would have otherwise not known existed.
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