02 December 2004

Feeds got you buried? Solutions to the "too many feeds, not enough time" problem

The problem isn't new. You keep finding more great feeds. But the more effective you get, the more reliable you are.

So you get more work, and can't get to the information and feeds you need to.

What to do?

There are two solutions.

Discussion

First, calendars and RSS. I'm not talking about putting your calendars on RSS. I'm talking about making your RSS-feeds a calendarible item.

This means giving your individual feeds a calendar. Rather than simply "have the feed", you need to put comments and have a method of segregating your feeds.

You manage people, things, and resources. Now with calendars you can manage feeds.

Second, you need to think of information in a broader picture. Not simply as words. But look at where it fits.

In your pipeline. On your drawing board.

RSS can change your life. If you manage your feeds. Before they manage you.


Solution 1: Calendarize your RSS


There are many calendars out there with RSS capability. When people think of RSS and Calendars, they think about using RSS to create a calendar. Ref Ref Ref

This is the opposite.

Rather than using RSS to manage your calendars. You're now going to use a calendar to manage your RSS.

Think of priorities. Not just your daily ones. But your career and personal goals. You've got stuff to get done.

Different feeds have different relevancies. You don't [and can't] read everything.

Besides, there are some situations where you need to shift things around. As a milestone gets closer you need to focus differently.

Your feeds need to know your changing priorities and focus. And you shouldn't have to tell them. They should be telling you.

Current forums do not discuss the concept

When I read a meeting notice about Calendars and RSS, I wonder ... will anyone ask about using calendars for the individual feed?

Let's take a look at a forum on RSS and calendars. When did you hear someone talk about "adding comments" to their feed?

We've got a valid forum talking about Calendars and RSS Ref; but there should also be something that talks about adding comments to feeds Ref.

Here is the architecture for RSS Calendars. This stuff started in the 1990s.

The new lexicon is prioritize feeds.

Smart developers are working on it. The challenges: Surmountable.


Features

  • Add comments to your feed

    - Box beside your feed entry
    - Links comments and calendar to your feed
    - Add comments about the Feed such as, when to follow-up on a particular event

  • Milestone Support

    It tracks your upcoming milestones so that the feeds that support you are given priority when you need it most.

    Where get permission to access the Calendar...

    ...The concept would reverse the process...and assign a calendar, with comments to each RSS-feed.

    ...Then aggregate the results...so that as each time unit passed... the most important calendar-priority ... put emphasis on those RSS-related feeds supporting that objective.

  • Omission Checker

    By clicking the "feed calendar" ... able to pinpoint a specific date when you want to have something moved to the head of the queue: "This is the day that I
    should be seeing something from this feed...if not, there’s a problem"

    You calendar events.

    Monitor multiple feed-calendars on a single platform.


  • ....[using milestones to prioritize RSS-reading]


    Solution 2: Graphical timing of your pipeline


    The problem with feeds is that its all text. You have to read it. However, there are some visual approach where you can zero-in on information.

    Consider a user's view of an RSS pipeline. Notice the pipeline has components.

    Consider a news aggregator that graphically displays the news. Notice how things change colors as they get different weightings.

    Wouldn't it be neat if "what things were being said" about a particular pipeline appeared as a picture along your pipeline?

    Consider Lisa's Podcasting pipeline. If she's looking for information about podcasting, she doesn't care about the RSS-pipeline; she wants feeds that tell her about the iPod pipeline.

    To save you time, when you're reviewing beta errors, you don't want text, you want to see a graphical representation of your "pipeline of interest" and quickly see what's being said about the pipeline.

    If you're interested in one small aspect, you want to see on your pipeline who else is also talking about that particular aspect.

    What's needed are some standardized templates to graphically illustrate a given "area of interest" and then a mechanism that will take your interest areas and dovetail that with the pipeline. Then you'll be able to see where your "are of interest" fits.

    No more reading volumes of text. You can see it.

    And the "areas of interest" that you've identified can be presented to you in pre-formatted tables. No more digging through endless beta-error reports.

    No more digging through thousands of blog entries. The feeds are first aggregated, and then the information you are looking for is placed in the pipeline that you are interested in. In a format that you create or select from a template.

    You're not just aggregating platforms, you're aggregating the support elements for each feed into that platform: Comments, calendars, milestones, and project management. All the stuff you need to manage the RSS feed you asked for.

    Now you can make it your feed.

    Example application

    Suppose you're closely monitoring FeedDemon.

    Rather than reproduce the records in text form, what this concept would do is graphically illustrate along the "FeedDemon pipeline" where the comment is located.

    When someone asks a question, you don't have to look at the feed if you already know "where that comment sits" in relationship to your pipeline. You don't have to read it and say, "Skip that." Rather, you can look at a single picture of your pipeline and say, "I'm most interested in this aspect and what more of this."

    Not their content. But your priorities.

    RSS feeds right now push. What this approach will do is both target your searches, and ensure the RSS-searches are timed and prioritized with your project, goals, and pipeline in mind. Not theirs. Yours. Not the feeds. Your goals.

    Also, someone like Stephen O'Grady comes up with some great ideas. Wouldn't it be nice if you could say, "Track" into your RSS-Calendar, and then have all the feeds related to this concept brought to you.

    In a summary form. Not words. But a graphical representation of this concept. So you can see how the new ideas fit in. And who is doing what. Less reading. More big picture. Faster comprehension.

    If you want, you can zoom into the specific feeds.

    With time, you can also track the development of the particular component within the pipeline in terms of percent complete. Sure, you want to know what's going on. But if you simply want a "summary report" at Milestone 2, there's no need for you to track every feed reporting every nuance.

    You decide how much detail you want. You choose when to place the milestones. And you decide what percent complete or percent satisfaction with respect to a criteria-threshold that you want the information. Not the feeds. You.

    Let that RSS Calendar be something that lets you manage the feeds.

    Make the web work for you. Optimize GUI. Incorporate this into your RSS Calendar. Show. Less reading.

    Information placement when you need it. Not when it needs you.

    This means making the "error reports" along a pipeline automated. Get rid of the manual e-mails. Look at what MS does with IE-errors: It's all automated.

    The developer's reporting system. Automated. More time to do what you want: Code.

    Less talk, more useful data

    Encourage developers to work with the browsers so that "errors along the pipelines" are automatically provided in the format that useful for developers. This means setting up alliances with MSFT so that part of the "developer's tools" is an integrated package linking the "new product being beta-tested" in a format that provides the information the developers need.

    You can read less of this and focus on the things that really matter to you. Ref

    It's up to you. Do you want to wade through feeds. Or do you want to have information in a format that's useful.

    The future of XML-RSS is a platform, not just data. It's a means to deliver to you, stuff you need. There's no sense giving you stuff you don't need.

    Especially when you don't need it. Yet.

    The RSS Calendar, as it currently stands, allows you to put calendars on RSS.

    What you really want is a means to schedule your RSS feeds. Place comments by those feeds. And have an automated system to follow-up, highlight, and present the most important feeds as you get closer to your milestones.

    And you want faster comprehension of data. Status. And progress. Not words. Pictures. Percent complete. And the option to tell your aggregators to ignore information and status until a certain time, place, and threshold are met.

    It's up to you. Not your feed.

    Make your software map, a real map. Not more text.

    RSS-providers can add enclosures to your feed. It's not really your feed until you can add your enclosures as well.

    Until you get a calendar to manage your feeds, your feeds will still manage you.

    FeedDemon's support forum.

    When you want to know . . . When you want to know.

    Summary

    There's no reason you have to be overwhelmed by your favorite feeds.

    There are two solutions:

    1. Calendarize your RSS feeds so that you can follow-up and prioritize the timing of the feeds.

    2. Graphically display your information along your area of interests. Focus less on text, and focus more on the pipeline status.

    When you control your feeds, then they'll really start to work for you.
    The problem isn't new. You keep finding more great feeds. But the more effective you get, the more reliable you are.

    So you get more work, and can't get to the information and feeds you need to.

    What to do?

    There are two solutions.

    Discussion

    First, calendars and RSS. I'm not talking about putting your calendars on RSS. I'm talking about making your RSS-feeds a calendarible item.

    This means giving your individual feeds a calendar. Rather than simply "have the feed", you need to put comments and have a method of segregating your feeds.

    You manage people, things, and resources. Now with calendars you can manage feeds.

    Second, you need to think of information in a broader picture. Not simply as words. But look at where it fits.

    In your pipeline. On your drawing board.

    RSS can change your life. If you manage your feeds. Before they manage you.


    Solution 1: Calendarize your RSS


    There are many calendars out there with RSS capability. When people think of RSS and Calendars, they think about using RSS to create a calendar. Ref Ref Ref

    This is the opposite.

    Rather than using RSS to manage your calendars. You're now going to use a calendar to manage your RSS.

    Think of priorities. Not just your daily ones. But your career and personal goals. You've got stuff to get done.

    Different feeds have different relevancies. You don't [and can't] read everything.

    Besides, there are some situations where you need to shift things around. As a milestone gets closer you need to focus differently.

    Your feeds need to know your changing priorities and focus. And you shouldn't have to tell them. They should be telling you.

    Current forums do not discuss the concept

    When I read a meeting notice about Calendars and RSS, I wonder ... will anyone ask about using calendars for the individual feed?

    Let's take a look at a forum on RSS and calendars. When did you hear someone talk about "adding comments" to their feed?

    We've got a valid forum talking about Calendars and RSS Ref; but there should also be something that talks about adding comments to feeds Ref.

    Here is the architecture for RSS Calendars. This stuff started in the 1990s.

    The new lexicon is prioritize feeds.

    Smart developers are working on it. The challenges: Surmountable.


    Features

  • Add comments to your feed

    - Box beside your feed entry
    - Links comments and calendar to your feed
    - Add comments about the Feed such as, when to follow-up on a particular event

  • Milestone Support

    It tracks your upcoming milestones so that the feeds that support you are given priority when you need it most.

    Where get permission to access the Calendar...

    ...The concept would reverse the process...and assign a calendar, with comments to each RSS-feed.

    ...Then aggregate the results...so that as each time unit passed... the most important calendar-priority ... put emphasis on those RSS-related feeds supporting that objective.

  • Omission Checker

    By clicking the "feed calendar" ... able to pinpoint a specific date when you want to have something moved to the head of the queue: "This is the day that I
    should be seeing something from this feed...if not, there’s a problem"

    You calendar events.

    Monitor multiple feed-calendars on a single platform.


  • ....[using milestones to prioritize RSS-reading]


    Solution 2: Graphical timing of your pipeline


    The problem with feeds is that its all text. You have to read it. However, there are some visual approach where you can zero-in on information.

    Consider a user's view of an RSS pipeline. Notice the pipeline has components.

    Consider a news aggregator that graphically displays the news. Notice how things change colors as they get different weightings.

    Wouldn't it be neat if "what things were being said" about a particular pipeline appeared as a picture along your pipeline?

    Consider Lisa's Podcasting pipeline. If she's looking for information about podcasting, she doesn't care about the RSS-pipeline; she wants feeds that tell her about the iPod pipeline.

    To save you time, when you're reviewing beta errors, you don't want text, you want to see a graphical representation of your "pipeline of interest" and quickly see what's being said about the pipeline.

    If you're interested in one small aspect, you want to see on your pipeline who else is also talking about that particular aspect.

    What's needed are some standardized templates to graphically illustrate a given "area of interest" and then a mechanism that will take your interest areas and dovetail that with the pipeline. Then you'll be able to see where your "are of interest" fits.

    No more reading volumes of text. You can see it.

    And the "areas of interest" that you've identified can be presented to you in pre-formatted tables. No more digging through endless beta-error reports.

    No more digging through thousands of blog entries. The feeds are first aggregated, and then the information you are looking for is placed in the pipeline that you are interested in. In a format that you create or select from a template.

    You're not just aggregating platforms, you're aggregating the support elements for each feed into that platform: Comments, calendars, milestones, and project management. All the stuff you need to manage the RSS feed you asked for.

    Now you can make it your feed.

    Example application

    Suppose you're closely monitoring FeedDemon.

    Rather than reproduce the records in text form, what this concept would do is graphically illustrate along the "FeedDemon pipeline" where the comment is located.

    When someone asks a question, you don't have to look at the feed if you already know "where that comment sits" in relationship to your pipeline. You don't have to read it and say, "Skip that." Rather, you can look at a single picture of your pipeline and say, "I'm most interested in this aspect and what more of this."

    Not their content. But your priorities.

    RSS feeds right now push. What this approach will do is both target your searches, and ensure the RSS-searches are timed and prioritized with your project, goals, and pipeline in mind. Not theirs. Yours. Not the feeds. Your goals.

    Also, someone like Stephen O'Grady comes up with some great ideas. Wouldn't it be nice if you could say, "Track" into your RSS-Calendar, and then have all the feeds related to this concept brought to you.

    In a summary form. Not words. But a graphical representation of this concept. So you can see how the new ideas fit in. And who is doing what. Less reading. More big picture. Faster comprehension.

    If you want, you can zoom into the specific feeds.

    With time, you can also track the development of the particular component within the pipeline in terms of percent complete. Sure, you want to know what's going on. But if you simply want a "summary report" at Milestone 2, there's no need for you to track every feed reporting every nuance.

    You decide how much detail you want. You choose when to place the milestones. And you decide what percent complete or percent satisfaction with respect to a criteria-threshold that you want the information. Not the feeds. You.

    Let that RSS Calendar be something that lets you manage the feeds.

    Make the web work for you. Optimize GUI. Incorporate this into your RSS Calendar. Show. Less reading.

    Information placement when you need it. Not when it needs you.

    This means making the "error reports" along a pipeline automated. Get rid of the manual e-mails. Look at what MS does with IE-errors: It's all automated.

    The developer's reporting system. Automated. More time to do what you want: Code.

    Less talk, more useful data

    Encourage developers to work with the browsers so that "errors along the pipelines" are automatically provided in the format that useful for developers. This means setting up alliances with MSFT so that part of the "developer's tools" is an integrated package linking the "new product being beta-tested" in a format that provides the information the developers need.

    You can read less of this and focus on the things that really matter to you. Ref

    It's up to you. Do you want to wade through feeds. Or do you want to have information in a format that's useful.

    The future of XML-RSS is a platform, not just data. It's a means to deliver to you, stuff you need. There's no sense giving you stuff you don't need.

    Especially when you don't need it. Yet.

    The RSS Calendar, as it currently stands, allows you to put calendars on RSS.

    What you really want is a means to schedule your RSS feeds. Place comments by those feeds. And have an automated system to follow-up, highlight, and present the most important feeds as you get closer to your milestones.

    And you want faster comprehension of data. Status. And progress. Not words. Pictures. Percent complete. And the option to tell your aggregators to ignore information and status until a certain time, place, and threshold are met.

    It's up to you. Not your feed.

    Make your software map, a real map. Not more text.

    RSS-providers can add enclosures to your feed. It's not really your feed until you can add your enclosures as well.

    Until you get a calendar to manage your feeds, your feeds will still manage you.

    FeedDemon's support forum.

    When you want to know . . . When you want to know.

    Summary

    There's no reason you have to be overwhelmed by your favorite feeds.

    There are two solutions:

    1. Calendarize your RSS feeds so that you can follow-up and prioritize the timing of the feeds.

    2. Graphically display your information along your area of interests. Focus less on text, and focus more on the pipeline status.

    When you control your feeds, then they'll really start to work for you.
    " />