27 December 2004

Search, del.icio.us, 27-Dec-04 UTC 16:06:38

Error

Content not searchable.

Concern

Known content with valid search terms unable to be found, pinpointed, or searched.


Sample failed search


Scott O'Grady has known links to Mud's Tests in delicious.

Problem: Searching del.icio.us using a valid search string produces no result.


Risk

Raises significant and substantial doubts, inter alia:

A. Blog-based customer comments/links related to corporate IT products can be easily be found; [No basis for claim that corporate personnel can locate, much less use, public comments to their products.]

B. Blogger-comments provide a useful feedback mechanism to corporate developers; [No basis for claim that blogs provide useful mechanism to monitor, much less respond to, public reaction to IT products]

C. That e-mail is an inferior method of transmitting beta-errors back to developers vice blogs. [No basis for claim that blogs provide a superior method than e-mail to provide direct product feedback to corporate personnel]

Comments

The IT community has a credibility problem. Not only have the products been launched with beta errors, but independent efforts to identify blog-comments related to products prove fleeting.

Moreover, there is a reasonable basis to question whether blogs content related to specific products can be searched and located.

It remains a problem and burden for the IT development community to explain:

Follow-up 1: What basis is there to believe that customer-comments can be found, much less acted upon

Follow-up 2: What method IT developers and Program managers [PMs] are using to incorporate web-based feedback and integrate these end-user comments into the development cycle

Given the searches fail to produce a result, it remains up to the developers to explain how they actually ensure the list of identified problems is comprehensive and reasonably mirrors the true problems users experience

Follow-up 3: What actual method IT developers and PMs are using to demonstrate that the proposed "next generation of products" actually dovetail with real public-comments and feedback

There appears to be a reasonable basis to question whether the "list of problems" is adequately prioritized given that problems identified in blogs cannot be found.

Follow-up 4: How they plan to identify and resolve the scope of IT and XML-feed defects that cannot be found, much less acted upon, through either the internet search engines, bookmark searches, or XML-feed searches.

There appears to be a reasonable basis to question the adequacy of planning, and the scope of work going forward. It appears likely that required work effort to complete the "real list of defects" is higher than that which is reported as a baseline for current proposals, thereby raising the likelihood of increased program costs relative to baseline.

Cost overruns

In short, the contract baselines for the current XML-feed related development efforts appear to be underscoped, inadequate, and in all probability will require additional funding just to complete the known defects, much less address the full scope of the errors and flaws which the users know about but there remains no plan in place to address.

Of concern is the possibility that future work efforts will solicit funds not to modernize new software, but to repair old software. It appears the risk is that current and future venture capital will be solicited to develop "new products," when, in reality, that money will be retroactively applied to previous efforts.

In short, venture capitalists need to carefully check where their funding is going: Is it going for new development, or to fix and repair problems in previous efforts?
Error

Content not searchable.

Concern

Known content with valid search terms unable to be found, pinpointed, or searched.


Sample failed search


Scott O'Grady has known links to Mud's Tests in delicious.

Problem: Searching del.icio.us using a valid search string produces no result.


Risk

Raises significant and substantial doubts, inter alia:

A. Blog-based customer comments/links related to corporate IT products can be easily be found; [No basis for claim that corporate personnel can locate, much less use, public comments to their products.]

B. Blogger-comments provide a useful feedback mechanism to corporate developers; [No basis for claim that blogs provide useful mechanism to monitor, much less respond to, public reaction to IT products]

C. That e-mail is an inferior method of transmitting beta-errors back to developers vice blogs. [No basis for claim that blogs provide a superior method than e-mail to provide direct product feedback to corporate personnel]

Comments

The IT community has a credibility problem. Not only have the products been launched with beta errors, but independent efforts to identify blog-comments related to products prove fleeting.

Moreover, there is a reasonable basis to question whether blogs content related to specific products can be searched and located.

It remains a problem and burden for the IT development community to explain:

Follow-up 1: What basis is there to believe that customer-comments can be found, much less acted upon

Follow-up 2: What method IT developers and Program managers [PMs] are using to incorporate web-based feedback and integrate these end-user comments into the development cycle

Given the searches fail to produce a result, it remains up to the developers to explain how they actually ensure the list of identified problems is comprehensive and reasonably mirrors the true problems users experience

Follow-up 3: What actual method IT developers and PMs are using to demonstrate that the proposed "next generation of products" actually dovetail with real public-comments and feedback

There appears to be a reasonable basis to question whether the "list of problems" is adequately prioritized given that problems identified in blogs cannot be found.

Follow-up 4: How they plan to identify and resolve the scope of IT and XML-feed defects that cannot be found, much less acted upon, through either the internet search engines, bookmark searches, or XML-feed searches.

There appears to be a reasonable basis to question the adequacy of planning, and the scope of work going forward. It appears likely that required work effort to complete the "real list of defects" is higher than that which is reported as a baseline for current proposals, thereby raising the likelihood of increased program costs relative to baseline.

Cost overruns

In short, the contract baselines for the current XML-feed related development efforts appear to be underscoped, inadequate, and in all probability will require additional funding just to complete the known defects, much less address the full scope of the errors and flaws which the users know about but there remains no plan in place to address.

Of concern is the possibility that future work efforts will solicit funds not to modernize new software, but to repair old software. It appears the risk is that current and future venture capital will be solicited to develop "new products," when, in reality, that money will be retroactively applied to previous efforts.

In short, venture capitalists need to carefully check where their funding is going: Is it going for new development, or to fix and repair problems in previous efforts?
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