23 December 2004

Spinning corporate monitoring of blogs: How many private e-mails did they ignore?

The latest public relations coup is to tout the competitive advantage of using blogs for data mining.

Brilliant. So why not the same excitement when e-mail came around?

Blogging and e-mail are no different: Information shows up on a screen, and the reader can read it.

What's actually happened is that blogging is making it more difficult for the corporations to ignore their inbox. E-mails got too overwhelming.

Now, corporations want us to believe that 'even more blogs' is a good thing. I'm not convinced.

Corporations are just spinning the benefits of blogs because they failed to take the initial e-mails seriously. Corporations would have us believe that the "many e-mails were not manageable," but now the even larger pool of bloggers is a good thing. That makes no sense.

The argument is flawed. Companies now have to spend more time analyzing the public blogs and the private e-mails. Of course, this assumes the "bad habit of ignoring e-mails" is suddenly changed. This is unlikely. A company arrogant enough to blow off private e-mails is just as likely to ignore blogs.

Blogs are not simply a new frontier. They are an admission that the direct e-mail system failed, corporations were not responsive to private e-mails, and it was only through public sunlight that corporations were going to take the comments seriously.

Does this mean that they'll change their ways and issue better beta-products? Not a chance.

In fact, there's every incentive to issue less robust products all the while knowing the solution, if properly orchestrated, can actually generate publicity.

If the developer hears nothing, there's "no problem,"; and if the developer does hear a complaint on a blog-feed they can ignore the blogger and make it a personal issue.

So much for actually solving problems in their infancy. The public remains outraged at products. Blogs aren't just about discussion. They are an admission that the more personal e-mails and "below the radar" approaches to problem failed.

Corporations lost allegiance from their customers when the corporation ignored the in-box. Blogging shows that companies that are unresponsive to private e-mails may face public discussion. Whether they do anything about it is another matter.
The latest public relations coup is to tout the competitive advantage of using blogs for data mining.

Brilliant. So why not the same excitement when e-mail came around?

Blogging and e-mail are no different: Information shows up on a screen, and the reader can read it.

What's actually happened is that blogging is making it more difficult for the corporations to ignore their inbox. E-mails got too overwhelming.

Now, corporations want us to believe that 'even more blogs' is a good thing. I'm not convinced.

Corporations are just spinning the benefits of blogs because they failed to take the initial e-mails seriously. Corporations would have us believe that the "many e-mails were not manageable," but now the even larger pool of bloggers is a good thing. That makes no sense.

The argument is flawed. Companies now have to spend more time analyzing the public blogs and the private e-mails. Of course, this assumes the "bad habit of ignoring e-mails" is suddenly changed. This is unlikely. A company arrogant enough to blow off private e-mails is just as likely to ignore blogs.

Blogs are not simply a new frontier. They are an admission that the direct e-mail system failed, corporations were not responsive to private e-mails, and it was only through public sunlight that corporations were going to take the comments seriously.

Does this mean that they'll change their ways and issue better beta-products? Not a chance.

In fact, there's every incentive to issue less robust products all the while knowing the solution, if properly orchestrated, can actually generate publicity.

If the developer hears nothing, there's "no problem,"; and if the developer does hear a complaint on a blog-feed they can ignore the blogger and make it a personal issue.

So much for actually solving problems in their infancy. The public remains outraged at products. Blogs aren't just about discussion. They are an admission that the more personal e-mails and "below the radar" approaches to problem failed.

Corporations lost allegiance from their customers when the corporation ignored the in-box. Blogging shows that companies that are unresponsive to private e-mails may face public discussion. Whether they do anything about it is another matter.
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