18 December 2004

When I say "let my feeds line up against my milestones" ... I'm not talking about the BEM

Scott et al,

With respect to the BEM-stuff....

My view of "matching personal tasks to feed" isn't to RSSify my events, but to do the opposite. It is to take my calendar, and then find the feeds that relate to that calendar; then display the feeds in a priority that highlights my objectives.

In a nutshell BEM and I are talking about opposite things. BEM is to publicize events; I'm talking about using my personal calendar to prioritize which feeds appear first on the platform of my choice [aggregator, webpage, blog etc]. Both rely on things that do not yet exist.

BEM simply aggregates calendars. The next step is to then allow the individual user to use this "aggregated calendar information" to target their personal feeds in support of those "whatever milestones and tasks."

The aggregators working with the search engines should be doing the work, not the end-user. As it stands, the RSS-XML related technology require the end-user to manually load feed-links to read them, and then wade through the morass to find what is most important relative to a given task.

I'm not interested in content or feeds; I'm interested in finding applying reliable information to support my objectives-results-outcomes. Success is not measured in how many feeds I have listed in my aggregator; its in terms of what I produce and deliver in a manner that generates positive operating cashflows, and in a manner that exceeds the opportunity cost of the alternatives.

I'm not clear what people have been doing as in, "RSS and XML has been around a while and the end-user's epxectations are not getting met." Compared to what I've seen, my expectations are quite "high" on what the feed-business is all about. Here are my other thoughts on what a "current" RSS-community would look like.

RSS-XML community is not the never-ending gravy train for bridge funding. Users need to see credible products that solve problems, not create more non-sense to wade through.

Ref Ref Ref Berkeley Event Model is interesting, but it's not what I'm talking about.
Scott et al,

With respect to the BEM-stuff....

My view of "matching personal tasks to feed" isn't to RSSify my events, but to do the opposite. It is to take my calendar, and then find the feeds that relate to that calendar; then display the feeds in a priority that highlights my objectives.

In a nutshell BEM and I are talking about opposite things. BEM is to publicize events; I'm talking about using my personal calendar to prioritize which feeds appear first on the platform of my choice [aggregator, webpage, blog etc]. Both rely on things that do not yet exist.

BEM simply aggregates calendars. The next step is to then allow the individual user to use this "aggregated calendar information" to target their personal feeds in support of those "whatever milestones and tasks."

The aggregators working with the search engines should be doing the work, not the end-user. As it stands, the RSS-XML related technology require the end-user to manually load feed-links to read them, and then wade through the morass to find what is most important relative to a given task.

I'm not interested in content or feeds; I'm interested in finding applying reliable information to support my objectives-results-outcomes. Success is not measured in how many feeds I have listed in my aggregator; its in terms of what I produce and deliver in a manner that generates positive operating cashflows, and in a manner that exceeds the opportunity cost of the alternatives.

I'm not clear what people have been doing as in, "RSS and XML has been around a while and the end-user's epxectations are not getting met." Compared to what I've seen, my expectations are quite "high" on what the feed-business is all about. Here are my other thoughts on what a "current" RSS-community would look like.

RSS-XML community is not the never-ending gravy train for bridge funding. Users need to see credible products that solve problems, not create more non-sense to wade through.

Ref Ref Ref Berkeley Event Model is interesting, but it's not what I'm talking about.
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