07 January 2005

Drupal: A framework to integrate raw data into an XML management tool for disaster preparation and recovery

Summary

Drupal could be a platform to help organize the efforts so that the XML-related information in the final-warning-system could address the issues: Taking the raw data that we find in Griffin's Blog and creating a system that approaches the XML table-concept.

Discussion

Building off the LandScan model, I proposed a concept to use XML feeds as part of the disaster warning and recovery system.

Peter Griffin, who coordinates the relief blog has alot of good information. One of the things I've noticed with Griffin's blog is the information is overwhelming. In the meantime, we might ask could the relief effort be better managed with an integrated approach to managing the XML-feed information.

The trick will be to use a system like Drupal that will move toward the final concept: Ensuring there is a two-way system in XML-feeds so that end-users can both receive and send-back information to a central table; and ensuring information is disseminated so that funding requirements can be matched directly with donors.

XML product: Two-way XML feeds on status, requirements

Think of a table. People sit around the table. They discuss. Use this analogy to think of XML feeds. XML feeds can be injected into a central platform or a table; and the various players can both input and receive information.

The key success of the future warning system will be one that allows people to quickly connect to this table, provide information, receive status, and get feedback on their requirements.

This is not to say that "having XML feeds" will solve Tsunami-notification-problems for those who have no technology. But it is a way to improve. Technology could be created to allow high-tech to integrate with low-tech:

  • Creating a mechanism to allow a weather warning to override local-area broadcasts on speakers or local radios;

  • Sending a special signal to monasteries to chime a special song or change colors on high-mountain peaks, or ignite colored-signal flares during daytime; and

  • Ensuring that the locals understand there has been a change in the music.

    This is similar to Bit-Torrent and FeedMesh: Fast dissemination of a single-status to all participants. The change is having two-way communication between the XML-table, and the end-user; and then timing the arrival of feeds to coincide with the calendar or program milestones.
  • Summary

    Drupal could be a platform to help organize the efforts so that the XML-related information in the final-warning-system could address the issues: Taking the raw data that we find in Griffin's Blog and creating a system that approaches the XML table-concept.

    Discussion

    Building off the LandScan model, I proposed a concept to use XML feeds as part of the disaster warning and recovery system.

    Peter Griffin, who coordinates the relief blog has alot of good information. One of the things I've noticed with Griffin's blog is the information is overwhelming. In the meantime, we might ask could the relief effort be better managed with an integrated approach to managing the XML-feed information.

    The trick will be to use a system like Drupal that will move toward the final concept: Ensuring there is a two-way system in XML-feeds so that end-users can both receive and send-back information to a central table; and ensuring information is disseminated so that funding requirements can be matched directly with donors.

    XML product: Two-way XML feeds on status, requirements

    Think of a table. People sit around the table. They discuss. Use this analogy to think of XML feeds. XML feeds can be injected into a central platform or a table; and the various players can both input and receive information.

    The key success of the future warning system will be one that allows people to quickly connect to this table, provide information, receive status, and get feedback on their requirements.

    This is not to say that "having XML feeds" will solve Tsunami-notification-problems for those who have no technology. But it is a way to improve. Technology could be created to allow high-tech to integrate with low-tech:

  • Creating a mechanism to allow a weather warning to override local-area broadcasts on speakers or local radios;

  • Sending a special signal to monasteries to chime a special song or change colors on high-mountain peaks, or ignite colored-signal flares during daytime; and

  • Ensuring that the locals understand there has been a change in the music.

    This is similar to Bit-Torrent and FeedMesh: Fast dissemination of a single-status to all participants. The change is having two-way communication between the XML-table, and the end-user; and then timing the arrival of feeds to coincide with the calendar or program milestones.
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