04 January 2005

XML Scrapbook -- Adjusting XML feed images, removing images, allowing the end-user to place the images as desired

Introducing XML Scrapbook. Kind of like how a newspaper publisher has no control over the content after you get your scissors out and make your own scrap-book.

Rather than require end-users with a mobile to save a complete file, it would be nice if the incoming images in the XML-feed were treated a little differently.

This is to say that it would be nice if the images could be stripped out, saved as code, then let the end-user reposition the image [as desired] all without actually downloading the file to the harddrive.

Something like Feedstream, Inc. but all browser-based, requiring no access to DOS. Be fun for mobiles.

End-reader can repositioning images to a desired layout

That way you could pre-select a layout. This is to say that a given webpage could be adjusted based on your preferences.

Rather than rely on the designer's views on "where the images should go," the XML-feed strip-tool would take all the content, and reposition it to match the end user's preferences. Kind of like what the browser does with font-size, but do it with the entire page.

Photoblog

Imagine a XML feed with images from a photoblog on an XML feed.

But the end-viewer [the person looking at the images-blog-feed for the first time]being able to tell the aggregator or other device "how they want the XML-feed-images to display.

Have various layout options as templates; and even let the end-user decide on a set-standard template if they choose; or have a random layout-option to increase the variation.

XML in copying machines

Neat if the tool that converted the image from .jpg to .xml [then back again], was something that could be used in copying machines.

That way, could quickly copy a book image, remove the image, and then digitize only the text; then later add the image back in a more desirable location.
Introducing XML Scrapbook. Kind of like how a newspaper publisher has no control over the content after you get your scissors out and make your own scrap-book.

Rather than require end-users with a mobile to save a complete file, it would be nice if the incoming images in the XML-feed were treated a little differently.

This is to say that it would be nice if the images could be stripped out, saved as code, then let the end-user reposition the image [as desired] all without actually downloading the file to the harddrive.

Something like Feedstream, Inc. but all browser-based, requiring no access to DOS. Be fun for mobiles.

End-reader can repositioning images to a desired layout

That way you could pre-select a layout. This is to say that a given webpage could be adjusted based on your preferences.

Rather than rely on the designer's views on "where the images should go," the XML-feed strip-tool would take all the content, and reposition it to match the end user's preferences. Kind of like what the browser does with font-size, but do it with the entire page.

Photoblog

Imagine a XML feed with images from a photoblog on an XML feed.

But the end-viewer [the person looking at the images-blog-feed for the first time]being able to tell the aggregator or other device "how they want the XML-feed-images to display.

Have various layout options as templates; and even let the end-user decide on a set-standard template if they choose; or have a random layout-option to increase the variation.

XML in copying machines

Neat if the tool that converted the image from .jpg to .xml [then back again], was something that could be used in copying machines.

That way, could quickly copy a book image, remove the image, and then digitize only the text; then later add the image back in a more desirable location.
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