20 January 2005

XML Select Preference -- Choosing who can read your feed, and automatically apply your preferences to new XML feeds and products


Summary


This has two aspects: Preferences for your feed that are automatically loaded; and a tool that will let you, the content provider, screen who gets access to your feed.


XML Select

Ever notice you can access any feed? What if you want to create some special feeds for special people.

XML Select is the tool to let you define who gets access to your feed. You can issue credits to whom you want; and when they show up, they use their credits. No credits? No access.

Think of this as a subscription management tool. There's no need to waste your time creating firewalls. Simply shut the door, and make the door disappear. Alice in Wonderland.

There's an analogy in advertising. If you have a customer that gets a rebate for 100 items; then buys the items, gets the rebate, then returns the items. That's alot of money gone.

What to do? You quit sending them the ads for rebates. The idea of a rebate is to encourage product insertion into a market, not give away money.

Same kind of thing with XML feeds. Just because you have a feed, it doesn't mean the world owns it. It's your feed. You should be able to decide who gets access to it, who can read it, and who can comment on it.

XML feeds without a blog

Think of being able to create a feed, but having no blog. That seems strange. But actually, that's what people really want when they have a target audience to send feeds to.

All you do is set up your blog to provide "access only comments", then stop publishing on your blog. Simply send the information through the XML system, make sure it posts to your target-audience-feed readers, then delete the content from your blog.

Subscribers are the ones with access to your comment feed

The trick to providing XML content is to make sure you're providing content. But why waste time and energy worrying about those who provide no value? Cut them off. Deny access. Take them out of the loop.

No need to build a firewall or protect your site. Simply put your comments on a separate feed, and build a system that will be subscription-only for your feed-comments. You decide who gets access, not them.

Rather than reacting to the unneeded content, simply make the decision first. Decide who gets access your content and feed. If they don't meet your needs, cut them off your subscription list.

The world is not a democracy when it comes to information. You as the content provider have no obligation to publicly display your information for all to read; nor do you have to let all people make comments.

If someone has a comment about content that they have access to, there's nothing stopping them from using their own tools and XML-platform to make their point.

Platforms can be created that provide subscription-only feed content, and remove the blog-access. Subscription lists for you XML feed do not have to be 100% available to all. You can choose to take someone off your XML-feed list. They can't get access if they never have access.

Don't block your IP. Simply block them from getting access to the content you want to disseminate. If they don't know its there, there's no way they're going to leave comments that offer nothing of value.

Example: Private RSS Feeds Ref

Screening device could limit unwanted content. Security system could be applied to comment-feeds: A blog-feed might be public, but the comment-feed could be by subscription-selection-filtering.

Bogus XML-feed

Also, in cases where your readers are taking advantage of your feed, simply create a tool that will direct them to a new feed. Change your code, only let a few know about it; and then continue providing your original subscribers with the garbage content.

Then, when you're ready, you force them to read your content, and make them wade through your content. Have this auto-generated and allow your preferred-content-readers know there is a difference and how to get access to the desired feed.

Pointing to a feed doesn't necessarily have to mean the same thing as posting to your blog. Create tools that allow you to just provide your content to your feed without having publicly-available blog-content.


Select Your Subscribers

  • Target your feeds.

  • Create tools that allow you to define who can read your feed.

  • Move from IP-related to "subscriber list"-feeds; or a "list of do not provide valid content" to

  • Move from user-end firewalls, to content-provider-end selection


  • Create tools that allows your feed to be removed from search engines when others from trouble-some sites are accessing the search engine. This is the same as saying, "Identify those sites you want to block, then create tools that ensure when those sites and locations attempt to use XML-related tools to find your content, it doesn't show up for them."

    Give your feed and XML-related tools the option to "not show up" when certain types of search terms are entered; or when searches are started from sites and people who want to deny your content. Let content-providers decide, "I do not want to be visible to _____." People have to buy information; and I can also deny information.

  • Attract them

    How to identify the "people to add to the 'not allowed to subscribe' list?

    Create a perfect, ideal platform that they'll want to use. Simply start adding "those who show up" to the list of "not allowed to subscribe." I'm not talking about a black list; I'm talking about making a tool that gives the content-providers more power over who gets access to the content.

    I don't have to tell you what I'm thinking. There's no requirement I let all people read my feed. It should be the content providers decision who gets access. Close the doors. Lock the windows. Keep them out.

    Those who are doing what they're supposed to do will get better seats, better content, more options, and a voice that gets noticed.

    Rather than simply creating new tools, ask: How can existing technology be deployed differently to address the issues?


    XML Preferences

    Creating a single step to transfer your XML-related preferences to all content and feeds


    Heard about that one-step-sign-up tool they have for newspapers online? You load up your information once, and everytime you get to a new website asking you for information [name, e-mail, password, address, etc] it automatically does it for you.

    Same kind of thing is needed for XML-feed-type things.

    Example: A new aggregator shows up. Or you get a new feed. Or you want to add something to your RSS Reader.

    Each of those tools asks for the same thing:
    - Name of the feed
    - Notes about the feed
    - Display options about that feed
    Those could be automatically loaded. But why stop there.

    Wouldn't it be nice to take any feed, and be able to reformat the content into a format you like. Kind of like the XML Scrapbook:


    XML Preferences
    - Layout
    - Foldering
    - Appearances of the feed
    - How to name and order things
    - Creating automatic summaries
    - Apply my preferences
    - What content to have
    - Types of notes to use
    Features
    - One-step
    - Initial set up
    - Works with all XML products
    - Transparent to user
    - Auto entered, formatted, and ready for you to read


    Ref Ref Ref Ref Ref David Sifry Technorati

  • Summary


    This has two aspects: Preferences for your feed that are automatically loaded; and a tool that will let you, the content provider, screen who gets access to your feed.


    XML Select

    Ever notice you can access any feed? What if you want to create some special feeds for special people.

    XML Select is the tool to let you define who gets access to your feed. You can issue credits to whom you want; and when they show up, they use their credits. No credits? No access.

    Think of this as a subscription management tool. There's no need to waste your time creating firewalls. Simply shut the door, and make the door disappear. Alice in Wonderland.

    There's an analogy in advertising. If you have a customer that gets a rebate for 100 items; then buys the items, gets the rebate, then returns the items. That's alot of money gone.

    What to do? You quit sending them the ads for rebates. The idea of a rebate is to encourage product insertion into a market, not give away money.

    Same kind of thing with XML feeds. Just because you have a feed, it doesn't mean the world owns it. It's your feed. You should be able to decide who gets access to it, who can read it, and who can comment on it.

    XML feeds without a blog

    Think of being able to create a feed, but having no blog. That seems strange. But actually, that's what people really want when they have a target audience to send feeds to.

    All you do is set up your blog to provide "access only comments", then stop publishing on your blog. Simply send the information through the XML system, make sure it posts to your target-audience-feed readers, then delete the content from your blog.

    Subscribers are the ones with access to your comment feed

    The trick to providing XML content is to make sure you're providing content. But why waste time and energy worrying about those who provide no value? Cut them off. Deny access. Take them out of the loop.

    No need to build a firewall or protect your site. Simply put your comments on a separate feed, and build a system that will be subscription-only for your feed-comments. You decide who gets access, not them.

    Rather than reacting to the unneeded content, simply make the decision first. Decide who gets access your content and feed. If they don't meet your needs, cut them off your subscription list.

    The world is not a democracy when it comes to information. You as the content provider have no obligation to publicly display your information for all to read; nor do you have to let all people make comments.

    If someone has a comment about content that they have access to, there's nothing stopping them from using their own tools and XML-platform to make their point.

    Platforms can be created that provide subscription-only feed content, and remove the blog-access. Subscription lists for you XML feed do not have to be 100% available to all. You can choose to take someone off your XML-feed list. They can't get access if they never have access.

    Don't block your IP. Simply block them from getting access to the content you want to disseminate. If they don't know its there, there's no way they're going to leave comments that offer nothing of value.

    Example: Private RSS Feeds Ref

    Screening device could limit unwanted content. Security system could be applied to comment-feeds: A blog-feed might be public, but the comment-feed could be by subscription-selection-filtering.

    Bogus XML-feed

    Also, in cases where your readers are taking advantage of your feed, simply create a tool that will direct them to a new feed. Change your code, only let a few know about it; and then continue providing your original subscribers with the garbage content.

    Then, when you're ready, you force them to read your content, and make them wade through your content. Have this auto-generated and allow your preferred-content-readers know there is a difference and how to get access to the desired feed.

    Pointing to a feed doesn't necessarily have to mean the same thing as posting to your blog. Create tools that allow you to just provide your content to your feed without having publicly-available blog-content.


    Select Your Subscribers

  • Target your feeds.

  • Create tools that allow you to define who can read your feed.

  • Move from IP-related to "subscriber list"-feeds; or a "list of do not provide valid content" to

  • Move from user-end firewalls, to content-provider-end selection


  • Create tools that allows your feed to be removed from search engines when others from trouble-some sites are accessing the search engine. This is the same as saying, "Identify those sites you want to block, then create tools that ensure when those sites and locations attempt to use XML-related tools to find your content, it doesn't show up for them."

    Give your feed and XML-related tools the option to "not show up" when certain types of search terms are entered; or when searches are started from sites and people who want to deny your content. Let content-providers decide, "I do not want to be visible to _____." People have to buy information; and I can also deny information.

  • Attract them

    How to identify the "people to add to the 'not allowed to subscribe' list?

    Create a perfect, ideal platform that they'll want to use. Simply start adding "those who show up" to the list of "not allowed to subscribe." I'm not talking about a black list; I'm talking about making a tool that gives the content-providers more power over who gets access to the content.

    I don't have to tell you what I'm thinking. There's no requirement I let all people read my feed. It should be the content providers decision who gets access. Close the doors. Lock the windows. Keep them out.

    Those who are doing what they're supposed to do will get better seats, better content, more options, and a voice that gets noticed.

    Rather than simply creating new tools, ask: How can existing technology be deployed differently to address the issues?


    XML Preferences

    Creating a single step to transfer your XML-related preferences to all content and feeds


    Heard about that one-step-sign-up tool they have for newspapers online? You load up your information once, and everytime you get to a new website asking you for information [name, e-mail, password, address, etc] it automatically does it for you.

    Same kind of thing is needed for XML-feed-type things.

    Example: A new aggregator shows up. Or you get a new feed. Or you want to add something to your RSS Reader.

    Each of those tools asks for the same thing:
    - Name of the feed
    - Notes about the feed
    - Display options about that feed
    Those could be automatically loaded. But why stop there.

    Wouldn't it be nice to take any feed, and be able to reformat the content into a format you like. Kind of like the XML Scrapbook:


    XML Preferences
    - Layout
    - Foldering
    - Appearances of the feed
    - How to name and order things
    - Creating automatic summaries
    - Apply my preferences
    - What content to have
    - Types of notes to use
    Features
    - One-step
    - Initial set up
    - Works with all XML products
    - Transparent to user
    - Auto entered, formatted, and ready for you to read


    Ref Ref Ref Ref Ref David Sifry Technorati
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