19 February 2005

XML Concepts: Developing Your Feed Community


Creative Commons License

Link to and cite as .

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License.




XML Targeted Feeds

Feedback feeds


Blogs have comments. But what about feeds? What if there was a unique feed-URI for comments. This information could be something that all the subscribers had access to. It would be a way to provide unique comments to the publisher.

The publisher could publish the XML-feed-code for the public to provide direct communication about the feed: Quality, suggestions, ideas, other areas they'd like the publisher to look into. Something that goes above and beyond what they can give with blog comments.

This feedback URI would have an ignore option. And publishes could change the code automatically. All on the ignore list would not get the updated URI code for the feedback.

This tool would give feed readers a common feed for feedback; and publishers could decide which content in that feedback-feed to make public in another feed, in another platform or in a blog.

Use this tag to talk about .


XML Arrange

Reader tool to organize feed content


Want a bigger picture of all your content?

Now you can get a birds eye view of your content. And a simple way to see new patterns.

This tool could take the search result-list and convert it to small images and boxes. Users could move the content around and create new ways of organizing the data.

Namely, subscribers could take a given feed, and then rearrange the order of that feed to find new patterns. This is similar to the power point slide. This would be a reader-end tool for feed publishing.

NewsGator has a nice clip feature that allows readers to save specific articles. But what if these feature was more broadly applied.

Readers would be able to create a visual map of the content, establish their own links and patterns like the Flickr photomap.

Also, these new visual-tools could help readers identify gaps in the publisher logic, or the data that the subscribers are collecting.

Think of this as being XML plus. It is better than a blog because the readers can actively engage in with the content and make it their own, re-order it, and find new patterns.

Use this tag to talk more about .


XML Template Arrange

Providing structure to multi-feeds


Getting lost in all those feeds?

Sometimes the problem isn't the amount of information. It's the information has no context of pattern. It really needs a bigger framework.

That's where this tool comes in. If there's going to be a visual map, why not have something that users can fall back onto as a starting point.

Namely, templates. The Template Arrange would allow readers to arrange the individual blog-feed-comments into specific templates, which could be saved and applied to new content.

These templates would provide quick form and structure to new data. Users could also share the templates and apply it to future content.

Users could make their own templates, and compare the various template patterns to identify gaps and weaknesses.

Rather than focus on how to read more, think of ways to more quickly create structures for new information. It helps make the information digestible.

Use this tag to talk more about .


XML Segregator

Creating new topics


Want to comment when you're reviewing the feed?

Imagine coming across something really interesting in a feed, and highlighting it to create an auto-feed for a new discussion. Right there, in the aggregator. No need to go back to the blog.

But this segregator doesn't have to be something that is only used in aggregators and feeds. It could be applied to blogs.

One thing about long blogs is that the content is well, long. What if there was a tool that allowed readers to snip and highlight content and suggest a new blog-spot.

Readers could highlight the text, press segregate, and create a new blog for that content. The original blog would have an auto-url to segregate the content. The new blog would have an auto-link back to the original.

This tool is like blog parsing, allowing focusing and nuances within a subject. A broad blog-spot could be expanded into more focused and detailed discussion on an area of interest. Readers and feed-users could recommend a parse with this tool.

There could also be the option to leave content in the original output and link back to the copy; or remove the content with a notation of what has been removed.

One feature would be XML Ghost. This would leave a space where the original content was swiped, with a note that says the content had been reblogged with a segregator into a larger discussion elsewhere. The content would still be readable at the ghost button.

This tool could be applied to either the blog for the feed by either the publisher or the subscriber. It would only change the appearance for the reader, not the actual content.

Use this tag to talk more about .


XML Association

Grouping feed content


Imagine coming across many pieces of information that really don't make sense by themselves, but you find a larger pattern. All you need is a quick too to quickly rearrange the various feed-content into a new pattern.

You could cut and paste them into an individual feed. But you can only save them in a single "saved or clipped file." What if you could make new feeds based on new patterns and topics?

This is the opposite of segregating. Readers could take feed content and associate it with new feeds.

By aligning the content, the new associations would form auto-links back and forth for quick indexing. This would work like a Flickr photomap, showing the origin and links of the ideas.

Make your own patterns. More than one file for clippings. But an entire index devoted to creating your new associations. That's what makes great feeds others are interested in!

Turning raw blog data into something that fits into a bigger picture and pattern. Now we're talking something that is both meaningful, novel, interesting and digestible.

All done within your aggregator, and quickly shared with those who are reading your newly created feeds. Post the newly created feed as an attachment for the others in your Feed Community to read. It's just for them. That's why you are a subscriber to that feed community.

Use this tag to talk more about .


XML Photo Surveyor

Photo mapping in 3-D


Want other views and angles of your favorite images?

Imagine having your own aggregator, with a custom feed, and being able to get "other views" of the images fed to you. Click on the image, state the time of day and angle you prefer, and the PhotoSurveyor gives you something close.

This combines Google map with flicker photo map. When users load their photos to Flicker, they can provide geo-location; and Google maps can pinpoint exactly where streets are located.

This tool would allow photo viewers the option to look at a given panorama from any geo-location. They could specify that they want to look East, and then see all images that display the images form their observing point.

Viewers cold request exact locations, and ask for all images of items across the street or the distant mountains. Reflections could be requested.

Panoramas could be requested based the users observing point on the map, and also request other angles of the same object. Views could specific images based on the direction, time of day, and weather.

Use this tag to talk more about .


XML Deny Override

Content control tools


Want to tell the commercial-users to stop swiping your blog-content?

Sometimes content gets swiped and posted on commercial sites to attract readers. They do this to sell their products. But the consumers never find out about your feed.

One way to combat this unauthorized commercial use is to have an override option. When you publish content, it could be indexed as a "created on this date" and a code assigned to you and your feed.

Other users of that content would have to show they've been authorized to use it, by signaling the proper code. No code? No fair use.

This would give the blog-feed-publisher the power to take ownership of particular content. The code would say that this content was published against their feed first; therefore all other users are required to display certain notices, or not use it is certain ways.

This would require a central registry system. Think of the RIAA method of getting licenses for music: If users do not pay the license fee they get a demand letter. This could be automated through the web.

Sites would get a pass if they have an RIAA like license for that content. If a web platform refuses to participate, then their site is alerted as being one that scrapes.

This system would auto-sends letters to site owner and US Attorney and Federal Trade Commission for investigation and possible prosecution for copyright violation. System would keep track of evidence, times, and attorney costs to be introduced in court.

This system would integrate with XML Ghost: It would inject a link into the swiping-site back to the original content, and also highlight the copied text and deny use on the commercial site. This tool would take discredited blog-entries and map them.

Those commercial sites that refused to permit their sites to be registered would be so promoted as a noncooperating commercial site that continues to swipe material. Send in the FTC!

Use this tag to talk more about .

Creative Commons License

Link to and cite as .

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License.




XML Targeted Feeds

Feedback feeds


Blogs have comments. But what about feeds? What if there was a unique feed-URI for comments. This information could be something that all the subscribers had access to. It would be a way to provide unique comments to the publisher.

The publisher could publish the XML-feed-code for the public to provide direct communication about the feed: Quality, suggestions, ideas, other areas they'd like the publisher to look into. Something that goes above and beyond what they can give with blog comments.

This feedback URI would have an ignore option. And publishes could change the code automatically. All on the ignore list would not get the updated URI code for the feedback.

This tool would give feed readers a common feed for feedback; and publishers could decide which content in that feedback-feed to make public in another feed, in another platform or in a blog.

Use this tag to talk about .


XML Arrange

Reader tool to organize feed content


Want a bigger picture of all your content?

Now you can get a birds eye view of your content. And a simple way to see new patterns.

This tool could take the search result-list and convert it to small images and boxes. Users could move the content around and create new ways of organizing the data.

Namely, subscribers could take a given feed, and then rearrange the order of that feed to find new patterns. This is similar to the power point slide. This would be a reader-end tool for feed publishing.

NewsGator has a nice clip feature that allows readers to save specific articles. But what if these feature was more broadly applied.

Readers would be able to create a visual map of the content, establish their own links and patterns like the Flickr photomap.

Also, these new visual-tools could help readers identify gaps in the publisher logic, or the data that the subscribers are collecting.

Think of this as being XML plus. It is better than a blog because the readers can actively engage in with the content and make it their own, re-order it, and find new patterns.

Use this tag to talk more about .


XML Template Arrange

Providing structure to multi-feeds


Getting lost in all those feeds?

Sometimes the problem isn't the amount of information. It's the information has no context of pattern. It really needs a bigger framework.

That's where this tool comes in. If there's going to be a visual map, why not have something that users can fall back onto as a starting point.

Namely, templates. The Template Arrange would allow readers to arrange the individual blog-feed-comments into specific templates, which could be saved and applied to new content.

These templates would provide quick form and structure to new data. Users could also share the templates and apply it to future content.

Users could make their own templates, and compare the various template patterns to identify gaps and weaknesses.

Rather than focus on how to read more, think of ways to more quickly create structures for new information. It helps make the information digestible.

Use this tag to talk more about .


XML Segregator

Creating new topics


Want to comment when you're reviewing the feed?

Imagine coming across something really interesting in a feed, and highlighting it to create an auto-feed for a new discussion. Right there, in the aggregator. No need to go back to the blog.

But this segregator doesn't have to be something that is only used in aggregators and feeds. It could be applied to blogs.

One thing about long blogs is that the content is well, long. What if there was a tool that allowed readers to snip and highlight content and suggest a new blog-spot.

Readers could highlight the text, press segregate, and create a new blog for that content. The original blog would have an auto-url to segregate the content. The new blog would have an auto-link back to the original.

This tool is like blog parsing, allowing focusing and nuances within a subject. A broad blog-spot could be expanded into more focused and detailed discussion on an area of interest. Readers and feed-users could recommend a parse with this tool.

There could also be the option to leave content in the original output and link back to the copy; or remove the content with a notation of what has been removed.

One feature would be XML Ghost. This would leave a space where the original content was swiped, with a note that says the content had been reblogged with a segregator into a larger discussion elsewhere. The content would still be readable at the ghost button.

This tool could be applied to either the blog for the feed by either the publisher or the subscriber. It would only change the appearance for the reader, not the actual content.

Use this tag to talk more about .


XML Association

Grouping feed content


Imagine coming across many pieces of information that really don't make sense by themselves, but you find a larger pattern. All you need is a quick too to quickly rearrange the various feed-content into a new pattern.

You could cut and paste them into an individual feed. But you can only save them in a single "saved or clipped file." What if you could make new feeds based on new patterns and topics?

This is the opposite of segregating. Readers could take feed content and associate it with new feeds.

By aligning the content, the new associations would form auto-links back and forth for quick indexing. This would work like a Flickr photomap, showing the origin and links of the ideas.

Make your own patterns. More than one file for clippings. But an entire index devoted to creating your new associations. That's what makes great feeds others are interested in!

Turning raw blog data into something that fits into a bigger picture and pattern. Now we're talking something that is both meaningful, novel, interesting and digestible.

All done within your aggregator, and quickly shared with those who are reading your newly created feeds. Post the newly created feed as an attachment for the others in your Feed Community to read. It's just for them. That's why you are a subscriber to that feed community.

Use this tag to talk more about .


XML Photo Surveyor

Photo mapping in 3-D


Want other views and angles of your favorite images?

Imagine having your own aggregator, with a custom feed, and being able to get "other views" of the images fed to you. Click on the image, state the time of day and angle you prefer, and the PhotoSurveyor gives you something close.

This combines Google map with flicker photo map. When users load their photos to Flicker, they can provide geo-location; and Google maps can pinpoint exactly where streets are located.

This tool would allow photo viewers the option to look at a given panorama from any geo-location. They could specify that they want to look East, and then see all images that display the images form their observing point.

Viewers cold request exact locations, and ask for all images of items across the street or the distant mountains. Reflections could be requested.

Panoramas could be requested based the users observing point on the map, and also request other angles of the same object. Views could specific images based on the direction, time of day, and weather.

Use this tag to talk more about .


XML Deny Override

Content control tools


Want to tell the commercial-users to stop swiping your blog-content?

Sometimes content gets swiped and posted on commercial sites to attract readers. They do this to sell their products. But the consumers never find out about your feed.

One way to combat this unauthorized commercial use is to have an override option. When you publish content, it could be indexed as a "created on this date" and a code assigned to you and your feed.

Other users of that content would have to show they've been authorized to use it, by signaling the proper code. No code? No fair use.

This would give the blog-feed-publisher the power to take ownership of particular content. The code would say that this content was published against their feed first; therefore all other users are required to display certain notices, or not use it is certain ways.

This would require a central registry system. Think of the RIAA method of getting licenses for music: If users do not pay the license fee they get a demand letter. This could be automated through the web.

Sites would get a pass if they have an RIAA like license for that content. If a web platform refuses to participate, then their site is alerted as being one that scrapes.

This system would auto-sends letters to site owner and US Attorney and Federal Trade Commission for investigation and possible prosecution for copyright violation. System would keep track of evidence, times, and attorney costs to be introduced in court.

This system would integrate with XML Ghost: It would inject a link into the swiping-site back to the original content, and also highlight the copied text and deny use on the commercial site. This tool would take discredited blog-entries and map them.

Those commercial sites that refused to permit their sites to be registered would be so promoted as a noncooperating commercial site that continues to swipe material. Send in the FTC!

Use this tag to talk more about .
-->

XML Feed Community

Feed aggregator platform tools


Users like the idea of getting more in XML feeds than what they can get with normal webpages or blogs. They also like the idea of having a centralized platform that is integrated, is easier to use than HTML-like groups.

What better way to deliver more than create aggregators that provide more than what users can get through traditional blogs.

  • Instant messaging

    One solution is to have instant messaging tied to the feeds. Subscribers could be on special subscription instant-message lists.

  • Link platform

    Users would like links that are quick to share. Think of a quick-link-share button that is one step. Just point, click, and send a message to share the links in a given group.

    Not something in a separate platform, but something that is specially brought into the aggregator as a separate feed. Think of a special place and unique button to showcase these feed-related links for the subscribing community.

  • Posting comments on feed

    When they read a feed, it would be interesting if there was a way to share comments that non-subscribers could not read or have access to. This would create an incentive for people to subscribe.

  • Image based aggregator

    Right now, all content that is text is simply that: Text. But when you look at PowerPoint, you can get something extra. It's those thumbnails.

    Users could move content around and more quickly navigate information if they had thumbnails of the content. Thumbnails would allow readers to add new content to exiting feed, and move the content around to find new patterns.

    The thumbnails could have a pop-up image so that the subscribers could zoom into the specific content they have cut, saved, and are rearranging.

    Also, readers could cut-and-paste the image-based content into new patterns or templates. In turn, these templates could be then farmed out into new feeds.

    All these tools, combined into your feed. Now, that's a community!

    Use this tag to talk more about


    Creative Commons License

    Link to and cite as .

    This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License.




    XML Targeted Feeds

    Feedback feeds


    Blogs have comments. But what about feeds? What if there was a unique feed-URI for comments. This information could be something that all the subscribers had access to. It would be a way to provide unique comments to the publisher.

    The publisher could publish the XML-feed-code for the public to provide direct communication about the feed: Quality, suggestions, ideas, other areas they'd like the publisher to look into. Something that goes above and beyond what they can give with blog comments.

    This feedback URI would have an ignore option. And publishes could change the code automatically. All on the ignore list would not get the updated URI code for the feedback.

    This tool would give feed readers a common feed for feedback; and publishers could decide which content in that feedback-feed to make public in another feed, in another platform or in a blog.

    Use this tag to talk about .


    XML Arrange

    Reader tool to organize feed content


    Want a bigger picture of all your content?

    Now you can get a birds eye view of your content. And a simple way to see new patterns.

    This tool could take the search result-list and convert it to small images and boxes. Users could move the content around and create new ways of organizing the data.

    Namely, subscribers could take a given feed, and then rearrange the order of that feed to find new patterns. This is similar to the power point slide. This would be a reader-end tool for feed publishing.

    NewsGator has a nice clip feature that allows readers to save specific articles. But what if these feature was more broadly applied.

    Readers would be able to create a visual map of the content, establish their own links and patterns like the Flickr photomap.

    Also, these new visual-tools could help readers identify gaps in the publisher logic, or the data that the subscribers are collecting.

    Think of this as being XML plus. It is better than a blog because the readers can actively engage in with the content and make it their own, re-order it, and find new patterns.

    Use this tag to talk more about .


    XML Template Arrange

    Providing structure to multi-feeds


    Getting lost in all those feeds?

    Sometimes the problem isn't the amount of information. It's the information has no context of pattern. It really needs a bigger framework.

    That's where this tool comes in. If there's going to be a visual map, why not have something that users can fall back onto as a starting point.

    Namely, templates. The Template Arrange would allow readers to arrange the individual blog-feed-comments into specific templates, which could be saved and applied to new content.

    These templates would provide quick form and structure to new data. Users could also share the templates and apply it to future content.

    Users could make their own templates, and compare the various template patterns to identify gaps and weaknesses.

    Rather than focus on how to read more, think of ways to more quickly create structures for new information. It helps make the information digestible.

    Use this tag to talk more about .


    XML Segregator

    Creating new topics


    Want to comment when you're reviewing the feed?

    Imagine coming across something really interesting in a feed, and highlighting it to create an auto-feed for a new discussion. Right there, in the aggregator. No need to go back to the blog.

    But this segregator doesn't have to be something that is only used in aggregators and feeds. It could be applied to blogs.

    One thing about long blogs is that the content is well, long. What if there was a tool that allowed readers to snip and highlight content and suggest a new blog-spot.

    Readers could highlight the text, press segregate, and create a new blog for that content. The original blog would have an auto-url to segregate the content. The new blog would have an auto-link back to the original.

    This tool is like blog parsing, allowing focusing and nuances within a subject. A broad blog-spot could be expanded into more focused and detailed discussion on an area of interest. Readers and feed-users could recommend a parse with this tool.

    There could also be the option to leave content in the original output and link back to the copy; or remove the content with a notation of what has been removed.

    One feature would be XML Ghost. This would leave a space where the original content was swiped, with a note that says the content had been reblogged with a segregator into a larger discussion elsewhere. The content would still be readable at the ghost button.

    This tool could be applied to either the blog for the feed by either the publisher or the subscriber. It would only change the appearance for the reader, not the actual content.

    Use this tag to talk more about .


    XML Association

    Grouping feed content


    Imagine coming across many pieces of information that really don't make sense by themselves, but you find a larger pattern. All you need is a quick too to quickly rearrange the various feed-content into a new pattern.

    You could cut and paste them into an individual feed. But you can only save them in a single "saved or clipped file." What if you could make new feeds based on new patterns and topics?

    This is the opposite of segregating. Readers could take feed content and associate it with new feeds.

    By aligning the content, the new associations would form auto-links back and forth for quick indexing. This would work like a Flickr photomap, showing the origin and links of the ideas.

    Make your own patterns. More than one file for clippings. But an entire index devoted to creating your new associations. That's what makes great feeds others are interested in!

    Turning raw blog data into something that fits into a bigger picture and pattern. Now we're talking something that is both meaningful, novel, interesting and digestible.

    All done within your aggregator, and quickly shared with those who are reading your newly created feeds. Post the newly created feed as an attachment for the others in your Feed Community to read. It's just for them. That's why you are a subscriber to that feed community.

    Use this tag to talk more about .


    XML Photo Surveyor

    Photo mapping in 3-D


    Want other views and angles of your favorite images?

    Imagine having your own aggregator, with a custom feed, and being able to get "other views" of the images fed to you. Click on the image, state the time of day and angle you prefer, and the PhotoSurveyor gives you something close.

    This combines Google map with flicker photo map. When users load their photos to Flicker, they can provide geo-location; and Google maps can pinpoint exactly where streets are located.

    This tool would allow photo viewers the option to look at a given panorama from any geo-location. They could specify that they want to look East, and then see all images that display the images form their observing point.

    Viewers cold request exact locations, and ask for all images of items across the street or the distant mountains. Reflections could be requested.

    Panoramas could be requested based the users observing point on the map, and also request other angles of the same object. Views could specific images based on the direction, time of day, and weather.

    Use this tag to talk more about .


    XML Deny Override

    Content control tools


    Want to tell the commercial-users to stop swiping your blog-content?

    Sometimes content gets swiped and posted on commercial sites to attract readers. They do this to sell their products. But the consumers never find out about your feed.

    One way to combat this unauthorized commercial use is to have an override option. When you publish content, it could be indexed as a "created on this date" and a code assigned to you and your feed.

    Other users of that content would have to show they've been authorized to use it, by signaling the proper code. No code? No fair use.

    This would give the blog-feed-publisher the power to take ownership of particular content. The code would say that this content was published against their feed first; therefore all other users are required to display certain notices, or not use it is certain ways.

    This would require a central registry system. Think of the RIAA method of getting licenses for music: If users do not pay the license fee they get a demand letter. This could be automated through the web.

    Sites would get a pass if they have an RIAA like license for that content. If a web platform refuses to participate, then their site is alerted as being one that scrapes.

    This system would auto-sends letters to site owner and US Attorney and Federal Trade Commission for investigation and possible prosecution for copyright violation. System would keep track of evidence, times, and attorney costs to be introduced in court.

    This system would integrate with XML Ghost: It would inject a link into the swiping-site back to the original content, and also highlight the copied text and deny use on the commercial site. This tool would take discredited blog-entries and map them.

    Those commercial sites that refused to permit their sites to be registered would be so promoted as a noncooperating commercial site that continues to swipe material. Send in the FTC!

    Use this tag to talk more about .

  • XML Feed Community

    Feed aggregator platform tools


    Users like the idea of getting more in XML feeds than what they can get with normal webpages or blogs. They also like the idea of having a centralized platform that is integrated, is easier to use than HTML-like groups.

    What better way to deliver more than create aggregators that provide more than what users can get through traditional blogs.

  • Instant messaging

    One solution is to have instant messaging tied to the feeds. Subscribers could be on special subscription instant-message lists.

  • Link platform

    Users would like links that are quick to share. Think of a quick-link-share button that is one step. Just point, click, and send a message to share the links in a given group.

    Not something in a separate platform, but something that is specially brought into the aggregator as a separate feed. Think of a special place and unique button to showcase these feed-related links for the subscribing community.

  • Posting comments on feed

    When they read a feed, it would be interesting if there was a way to share comments that non-subscribers could not read or have access to. This would create an incentive for people to subscribe.

  • Image based aggregator

    Right now, all content that is text is simply that: Text. But when you look at PowerPoint, you can get something extra. It's those thumbnails.

    Users could move content around and more quickly navigate information if they had thumbnails of the content. Thumbnails would allow readers to add new content to exiting feed, and move the content around to find new patterns.

    The thumbnails could have a pop-up image so that the subscribers could zoom into the specific content they have cut, saved, and are rearranging.

    Also, readers could cut-and-paste the image-based content into new patterns or templates. In turn, these templates could be then farmed out into new feeds.

    All these tools, combined into your feed. Now, that's a community!

    Use this tag to talk more about


    Creative Commons License

    Link to and cite as .

    This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License.




    XML Targeted Feeds

    Feedback feeds


    Blogs have comments. But what about feeds? What if there was a unique feed-URI for comments. This information could be something that all the subscribers had access to. It would be a way to provide unique comments to the publisher.

    The publisher could publish the XML-feed-code for the public to provide direct communication about the feed: Quality, suggestions, ideas, other areas they'd like the publisher to look into. Something that goes above and beyond what they can give with blog comments.

    This feedback URI would have an ignore option. And publishes could change the code automatically. All on the ignore list would not get the updated URI code for the feedback.

    This tool would give feed readers a common feed for feedback; and publishers could decide which content in that feedback-feed to make public in another feed, in another platform or in a blog.

    Use this tag to talk about .


    XML Arrange

    Reader tool to organize feed content


    Want a bigger picture of all your content?

    Now you can get a birds eye view of your content. And a simple way to see new patterns.

    This tool could take the search result-list and convert it to small images and boxes. Users could move the content around and create new ways of organizing the data.

    Namely, subscribers could take a given feed, and then rearrange the order of that feed to find new patterns. This is similar to the power point slide. This would be a reader-end tool for feed publishing.

    NewsGator has a nice clip feature that allows readers to save specific articles. But what if these feature was more broadly applied.

    Readers would be able to create a visual map of the content, establish their own links and patterns like the Flickr photomap.

    Also, these new visual-tools could help readers identify gaps in the publisher logic, or the data that the subscribers are collecting.

    Think of this as being XML plus. It is better than a blog because the readers can actively engage in with the content and make it their own, re-order it, and find new patterns.

    Use this tag to talk more about .


    XML Template Arrange

    Providing structure to multi-feeds


    Getting lost in all those feeds?

    Sometimes the problem isn't the amount of information. It's the information has no context of pattern. It really needs a bigger framework.

    That's where this tool comes in. If there's going to be a visual map, why not have something that users can fall back onto as a starting point.

    Namely, templates. The Template Arrange would allow readers to arrange the individual blog-feed-comments into specific templates, which could be saved and applied to new content.

    These templates would provide quick form and structure to new data. Users could also share the templates and apply it to future content.

    Users could make their own templates, and compare the various template patterns to identify gaps and weaknesses.

    Rather than focus on how to read more, think of ways to more quickly create structures for new information. It helps make the information digestible.

    Use this tag to talk more about .


    XML Segregator

    Creating new topics


    Want to comment when you're reviewing the feed?

    Imagine coming across something really interesting in a feed, and highlighting it to create an auto-feed for a new discussion. Right there, in the aggregator. No need to go back to the blog.

    But this segregator doesn't have to be something that is only used in aggregators and feeds. It could be applied to blogs.

    One thing about long blogs is that the content is well, long. What if there was a tool that allowed readers to snip and highlight content and suggest a new blog-spot.

    Readers could highlight the text, press segregate, and create a new blog for that content. The original blog would have an auto-url to segregate the content. The new blog would have an auto-link back to the original.

    This tool is like blog parsing, allowing focusing and nuances within a subject. A broad blog-spot could be expanded into more focused and detailed discussion on an area of interest. Readers and feed-users could recommend a parse with this tool.

    There could also be the option to leave content in the original output and link back to the copy; or remove the content with a notation of what has been removed.

    One feature would be XML Ghost. This would leave a space where the original content was swiped, with a note that says the content had been reblogged with a segregator into a larger discussion elsewhere. The content would still be readable at the ghost button.

    This tool could be applied to either the blog for the feed by either the publisher or the subscriber. It would only change the appearance for the reader, not the actual content.

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    XML Association

    Grouping feed content


    Imagine coming across many pieces of information that really don't make sense by themselves, but you find a larger pattern. All you need is a quick too to quickly rearrange the various feed-content into a new pattern.

    You could cut and paste them into an individual feed. But you can only save them in a single "saved or clipped file." What if you could make new feeds based on new patterns and topics?

    This is the opposite of segregating. Readers could take feed content and associate it with new feeds.

    By aligning the content, the new associations would form auto-links back and forth for quick indexing. This would work like a Flickr photomap, showing the origin and links of the ideas.

    Make your own patterns. More than one file for clippings. But an entire index devoted to creating your new associations. That's what makes great feeds others are interested in!

    Turning raw blog data into something that fits into a bigger picture and pattern. Now we're talking something that is both meaningful, novel, interesting and digestible.

    All done within your aggregator, and quickly shared with those who are reading your newly created feeds. Post the newly created feed as an attachment for the others in your Feed Community to read. It's just for them. That's why you are a subscriber to that feed community.

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    XML Photo Surveyor

    Photo mapping in 3-D


    Want other views and angles of your favorite images?

    Imagine having your own aggregator, with a custom feed, and being able to get "other views" of the images fed to you. Click on the image, state the time of day and angle you prefer, and the PhotoSurveyor gives you something close.

    This combines Google map with flicker photo map. When users load their photos to Flicker, they can provide geo-location; and Google maps can pinpoint exactly where streets are located.

    This tool would allow photo viewers the option to look at a given panorama from any geo-location. They could specify that they want to look East, and then see all images that display the images form their observing point.

    Viewers cold request exact locations, and ask for all images of items across the street or the distant mountains. Reflections could be requested.

    Panoramas could be requested based the users observing point on the map, and also request other angles of the same object. Views could specific images based on the direction, time of day, and weather.

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    XML Deny Override

    Content control tools


    Want to tell the commercial-users to stop swiping your blog-content?

    Sometimes content gets swiped and posted on commercial sites to attract readers. They do this to sell their products. But the consumers never find out about your feed.

    One way to combat this unauthorized commercial use is to have an override option. When you publish content, it could be indexed as a "created on this date" and a code assigned to you and your feed.

    Other users of that content would have to show they've been authorized to use it, by signaling the proper code. No code? No fair use.

    This would give the blog-feed-publisher the power to take ownership of particular content. The code would say that this content was published against their feed first; therefore all other users are required to display certain notices, or not use it is certain ways.

    This would require a central registry system. Think of the RIAA method of getting licenses for music: If users do not pay the license fee they get a demand letter. This could be automated through the web.

    Sites would get a pass if they have an RIAA like license for that content. If a web platform refuses to participate, then their site is alerted as being one that scrapes.

    This system would auto-sends letters to site owner and US Attorney and Federal Trade Commission for investigation and possible prosecution for copyright violation. System would keep track of evidence, times, and attorney costs to be introduced in court.

    This system would integrate with XML Ghost: It would inject a link into the swiping-site back to the original content, and also highlight the copied text and deny use on the commercial site. This tool would take discredited blog-entries and map them.

    Those commercial sites that refused to permit their sites to be registered would be so promoted as a noncooperating commercial site that continues to swipe material. Send in the FTC!

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