08 March 2005

XML Concepts: Auto-translating plain text to executable XML code


Translating plain language to XML

Converts normal language to executable XML code


There are many translation tools.

The next step is a tool converting plain language to executable XML.

This would convert plain language to Java, HTML, then XML. The tool would translate the language into executable code; inject the code into the platform; report content provide summary results, and then execute the code to return results and achieve the end-user objective.

Why can’t we do that?

One problem this tool will solve is overcoming illusory roadblocks. One such illusion is the misnomer that information cannot be transferred between platforms because of security issues.

Auto-sign in is possible. Universal information can be saved and applied to new sites. The problem is not security. The problem is that good ideas are stifled by those who cite coding standards without regard to whether the task can already occur.

Users should be able to get permission to go into other areas to access and change information. There should be no reason to wait for someone to say, “That cannot be done.” Rather, what users need is a simple method to convert their reasonable ideas into executable code.


LEGAL NOTICE


Creative Commons License

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License.

You may not copy any of this work to promote a commercial product on any site or medium in the universe.

If you see this work posted on a commercial site, it violates the creative commons license; and the author does not endorse the commercial product.

Free to use for non-commercial uses. Link to this original blogspot and cite as .


Auto-Sign-in

If you’ve ever gone to a newspaper website, you’ll know that multiple sign-ins can be annoying. The same information gets transferred: User ID, password, etc.

One tool was created to auto-assign this information. At the other end of the spectrum are the bots which auto-sign-up for accounts, and at worst create DNS problems.

The auto-sign-in procedure is fairly straightforward:


Auto-sign-in

  • Save sign-in information
  • Assign link-site to parameter info
  • Arrive at site, recognize parameters
  • Report information, assign to sign-in boxes
  • Submit, open, enter
  • Perform task, close, leave


  • This is a very simple set of steps. They could easily be auto-related with the words or tag, “Sign-in.” A simple phrase that could be translated from plain text-tag into a simple routine in either Java, HTML, or XML.

    Let’s take a look at another example:


    XML Feed Weaver

    Mixing feeds


    Newsgator has a clipping tool. Users can save things from their feeds. These saved items go into a new feed. The idea of converting one feed, then combining it with another feed, to create a third-new-feed is not novel.

    What would be novel is to let end-users simply say in plaintext, “Mix these feeds”, and a program gets generated to accomplish that task.

    Currently, site and comment feeds tend to be segregated. Why not weave the two feeds together? An XML Feed Weaver would simply mix site and comment feeds into one single feed.

    The tagging mechanism would be related to the track-back system. The tool would associate the blog and comments through the common trackback URL. This auto-link discovery step would be injected into the platform and allow the feeds to get mixed.

    The trick is to associate the specific blog with the appropriate comments.

    Assigning comment feed to blog url

    Here are the steps that the converter would generate:


    Assign feed


  • Identify two feeds, validate, ensure all comments have a link, url track to site blog
  • Count number of items in blog, save value; do the same for comments
  • Place site feed first; comment feed second
  • Review comment feed: ID url reference; look at site feed and find same codes
  • Match
  • Next blogspot entry
  • Return unassigned comments to end
  • Generate a reportable feed
  • Assign distinct URI to combined feed
  • Sign-in and report URI to aggregator
  • Assign to matching folder; create flag that feed added to folder; or assign new folder
  • Report all content as new, unread


  • Let’s take a look at another example of converting plain text to XML.


    Personal content to RSS

    Converts any content into an XML feed


    This tool is a multi-platform tool. It auto-assigns information. The user can direct the tool to any personal information. This tool would convert any personal content into a feed that can be read into the personal aggregator.

    Tasks

    The translator tool would read, “personal content to RSS” [or another tag-phrase], and return the following steps in either Java, HTML, then an executable XML code:


    Creating XML feeds from personal content

  • Sign into e-mail, open e-mail folders, discover new content
  • Capture content
  • Convert to XML feed
  • Take feed and assign to aggregator
  • Sign into aggregator
  • Goes to location to add URI
  • Posts URI
  • Reports new content


  • The above steps are fairly straight forward. We can then break them down into two major headings: Extracting the data, then assigning the newly created feed.

    Part I: Extract Data



    Auto-generated extraction commands

  • Tool signs in to e-mail account; takes information form saved data, applies to site, enters
  • Tool goes to mail, checks new mail
  • Identifies number of mail items, create registry to save each
  • Start with first item; goes to XML-IP-view, copy/save
  • Next; until total equals the number of new mail items
  • Tool marks all items as read; saves e-mail to target files; closes account; leaves.


  • Part II: Create-Report XML feed to Aggregator



    Auto-generated feed assignment commands


  • Assigns cache to unique RI
  • Tests URI for uniqueness, readability, corrects errors
  • Tool checks whether there is duplicate content; if duplicate content exists, tool shows only one
  • Goes to aggregator; signs-in automatically; goes to aggregator-feed adder; adds feed
  • Highlights all content as new.


  • The above steps could easily be linked with a single tag called, “Create XML feed from my mail”. At best it could be transparent, especially when we have an aggregator assigned to the same service that provides an e-mail account.

    XML Tool Box

    What I’ve been talking about is assigning code to specific words. We can also apply this concept to cross-platform functions.

    One current security problem is injecting new code into new platforms. One solution is to think about transferring information about codes, not the codes themselves.

    Send information about the code

    Think of magnetism. When you float a magnet over something that is metal, there is a magnetic field. The metal object gets affected.

    Also, think about an MRI. What happens is the polarity of the molecules slightly changes as you go through the magnetic field. These slight changes are then recorded.

    What is going on is there is a receiver or target, and an outside instrument can detect these changes, and then translate those changes into information.

    The same could be done with codes and XML. The trick is to put the information about the codes on a wireless data stream, and permit cross-platform communication of information bout the codes, without actually transferring codes.

    How is this done? Look at the above steps I just went through. Notice something. All the key marker terms have multiple detailed words.

    The same could be done with codes. We could break down a single tag-phrase into multiple steps, then save these detailed operations as set parameters in the original platform.

    Then, when someone shows up and gives a new command, there is no need to create or transfer new code. Rather, the outside entity merely signals to the inside conductor, “This is what I want,” and then the inside conductor translates that signal into a single command; and then goes about re-arranging the already existing sub-elements within the platform.

    An XML tool box is simply a number of codes and protocols which can be re-assembled. The tool box takes external commands; the firewall remains; there is no change of code; and no need to add code.

    All we’re doing is simply transferring information in a new way; and then re-assembling the basic coding elements back together. But we haven’t actually sent code. We’ve sent information about the code.


    XML Product Upgrade

    Using Quantum XML feeds to upgrade products


    The magnet concept can be applied to new products. Again, the solution is to re-arrange existing elements and create something new.

    Let’s take a software package like Excel. There are tools that allow users to read hints and ideas; and also provide feedback to Microsoft. The information goes back and forth.

    What could be done is create a platform and software package on how to change the feed and change features without transferring any code.

    Rather, the external signals would tell the internal conductor how to re-arrange the elements.

    In this case, there would already be embedded commands that recognize a signal as “add another element to this drop-down menu” or “re-do this procedure to verify that it actually displays as the user expects.”

    This approach to software upgrades would depend on the coding functions to be broken down into their basic elements; and design the platform to accept changes to the eternal functions without a change in the code, just a notification to create new elements from that which has already been designed.

    This approach would be permission based to rearrange tools and elements within the platform. The software vendor could assign specific codes, and randomize them on some unique patterns so that only the vendor could access them.

    Quantum XML

    Think of Quantum physics. When there are two separated objects, there can be a relationship between the two. The same principle applies in this case.

    The sender-vendor would operate along one set of parameters; and the product-receiver would operate independently; however, they would both cross-communicate at times unknown to anyone else, but they would then communicate status and how to rearrange the basic elements.

    Essentially what we’re talking about is using a Trojan Horse for good. The receiver’s protocol is already inside the template.

    An external signal would direct the internal elements to rearrange. The signal would go from an external source, sent by coded message on an XML feed, and the conductor within the platform would direct the code.

    The two sets of signals would be randomized uniquely and coordinated without a direct connection. The protocol could be integrated with new products.

    Let me say that again for the enterprise crowd. This protocol could be integrated with new products. It would enhance the product, not compete with it. The vendor could sell the code, rather than selling software.

    This is where XML comes in. XML would be the platform to send and receive these product upgrade codes. The advantage is that we’d have less distribution of software, but greater numbers of sales.

    The lessons from the RIAA and music industry would need to be applied: How to share the upgrades so that they are unique to a single end-user, but so that all users would have their unique code that performs the same function. This is where matching, time-limits, and exact coding comes in.

    How this is accomplished

    Here are the basic steps to accomplish this objective. Again, we’re talking about converting a simple tag-phrase into multiple steps; then assigning Java, HTML, or XML code to that single command.

    Here are the basic steps generated from this single command:


    Auto-generated XML Quantum Commands

  • Basic building blocks are identified, created, saved in platform
  • Duplicate, replicate function activated, tested
  • Confirm interface between internal and external platforms
  • New functions created using basic elements within the platform
  • Functions assigned xml-wifi code; sent to conductor; conductor assigns elements to match xml-wifi code;
  • Program executes.


  • See how easy that is? No cross platform coding. No security issues. Just sending information about the code. Just like an MRI and magnetic field work.

    There are many language translation tools. This tool would translate blogger comments into executable code that could be automatically injected into their blogging templates.

    Your wish is now an XML command.

    Translating plain language to XML

    Converts normal language to executable XML code


    There are many translation tools.

    The next step is a tool converting plain language to executable XML.

    This would convert plain language to Java, HTML, then XML. The tool would translate the language into executable code; inject the code into the platform; report content provide summary results, and then execute the code to return results and achieve the end-user objective.

    Why can’t we do that?

    One problem this tool will solve is overcoming illusory roadblocks. One such illusion is the misnomer that information cannot be transferred between platforms because of security issues.

    Auto-sign in is possible. Universal information can be saved and applied to new sites. The problem is not security. The problem is that good ideas are stifled by those who cite coding standards without regard to whether the task can already occur.

    Users should be able to get permission to go into other areas to access and change information. There should be no reason to wait for someone to say, “That cannot be done.” Rather, what users need is a simple method to convert their reasonable ideas into executable code.


    LEGAL NOTICE


    Creative Commons License

    This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License.

    You may not copy any of this work to promote a commercial product on any site or medium in the universe.

    If you see this work posted on a commercial site, it violates the creative commons license; and the author does not endorse the commercial product.

    Free to use for non-commercial uses. Link to this original blogspot and cite as .


    Auto-Sign-in

    If you’ve ever gone to a newspaper website, you’ll know that multiple sign-ins can be annoying. The same information gets transferred: User ID, password, etc.

    One tool was created to auto-assign this information. At the other end of the spectrum are the bots which auto-sign-up for accounts, and at worst create DNS problems.

    The auto-sign-in procedure is fairly straightforward:


    Auto-sign-in

  • Save sign-in information
  • Assign link-site to parameter info
  • Arrive at site, recognize parameters
  • Report information, assign to sign-in boxes
  • Submit, open, enter
  • Perform task, close, leave


  • This is a very simple set of steps. They could easily be auto-related with the words or tag, “Sign-in.” A simple phrase that could be translated from plain text-tag into a simple routine in either Java, HTML, or XML.

    Let’s take a look at another example:


    XML Feed Weaver

    Mixing feeds


    Newsgator has a clipping tool. Users can save things from their feeds. These saved items go into a new feed. The idea of converting one feed, then combining it with another feed, to create a third-new-feed is not novel.

    What would be novel is to let end-users simply say in plaintext, “Mix these feeds”, and a program gets generated to accomplish that task.

    Currently, site and comment feeds tend to be segregated. Why not weave the two feeds together? An XML Feed Weaver would simply mix site and comment feeds into one single feed.

    The tagging mechanism would be related to the track-back system. The tool would associate the blog and comments through the common trackback URL. This auto-link discovery step would be injected into the platform and allow the feeds to get mixed.

    The trick is to associate the specific blog with the appropriate comments.

    Assigning comment feed to blog url

    Here are the steps that the converter would generate:


    Assign feed


  • Identify two feeds, validate, ensure all comments have a link, url track to site blog
  • Count number of items in blog, save value; do the same for comments
  • Place site feed first; comment feed second
  • Review comment feed: ID url reference; look at site feed and find same codes
  • Match
  • Next blogspot entry
  • Return unassigned comments to end
  • Generate a reportable feed
  • Assign distinct URI to combined feed
  • Sign-in and report URI to aggregator
  • Assign to matching folder; create flag that feed added to folder; or assign new folder
  • Report all content as new, unread


  • Let’s take a look at another example of converting plain text to XML.


    Personal content to RSS

    Converts any content into an XML feed


    This tool is a multi-platform tool. It auto-assigns information. The user can direct the tool to any personal information. This tool would convert any personal content into a feed that can be read into the personal aggregator.

    Tasks

    The translator tool would read, “personal content to RSS” [or another tag-phrase], and return the following steps in either Java, HTML, then an executable XML code:


    Creating XML feeds from personal content

  • Sign into e-mail, open e-mail folders, discover new content
  • Capture content
  • Convert to XML feed
  • Take feed and assign to aggregator
  • Sign into aggregator
  • Goes to location to add URI
  • Posts URI
  • Reports new content


  • The above steps are fairly straight forward. We can then break them down into two major headings: Extracting the data, then assigning the newly created feed.

    Part I: Extract Data



    Auto-generated extraction commands

  • Tool signs in to e-mail account; takes information form saved data, applies to site, enters
  • Tool goes to mail, checks new mail
  • Identifies number of mail items, create registry to save each
  • Start with first item; goes to XML-IP-view, copy/save
  • Next; until total equals the number of new mail items
  • Tool marks all items as read; saves e-mail to target files; closes account; leaves.


  • Part II: Create-Report XML feed to Aggregator



    Auto-generated feed assignment commands


  • Assigns cache to unique RI
  • Tests URI for uniqueness, readability, corrects errors
  • Tool checks whether there is duplicate content; if duplicate content exists, tool shows only one
  • Goes to aggregator; signs-in automatically; goes to aggregator-feed adder; adds feed
  • Highlights all content as new.


  • The above steps could easily be linked with a single tag called, “Create XML feed from my mail”. At best it could be transparent, especially when we have an aggregator assigned to the same service that provides an e-mail account.

    XML Tool Box

    What I’ve been talking about is assigning code to specific words. We can also apply this concept to cross-platform functions.

    One current security problem is injecting new code into new platforms. One solution is to think about transferring information about codes, not the codes themselves.

    Send information about the code

    Think of magnetism. When you float a magnet over something that is metal, there is a magnetic field. The metal object gets affected.

    Also, think about an MRI. What happens is the polarity of the molecules slightly changes as you go through the magnetic field. These slight changes are then recorded.

    What is going on is there is a receiver or target, and an outside instrument can detect these changes, and then translate those changes into information.

    The same could be done with codes and XML. The trick is to put the information about the codes on a wireless data stream, and permit cross-platform communication of information bout the codes, without actually transferring codes.

    How is this done? Look at the above steps I just went through. Notice something. All the key marker terms have multiple detailed words.

    The same could be done with codes. We could break down a single tag-phrase into multiple steps, then save these detailed operations as set parameters in the original platform.

    Then, when someone shows up and gives a new command, there is no need to create or transfer new code. Rather, the outside entity merely signals to the inside conductor, “This is what I want,” and then the inside conductor translates that signal into a single command; and then goes about re-arranging the already existing sub-elements within the platform.

    An XML tool box is simply a number of codes and protocols which can be re-assembled. The tool box takes external commands; the firewall remains; there is no change of code; and no need to add code.

    All we’re doing is simply transferring information in a new way; and then re-assembling the basic coding elements back together. But we haven’t actually sent code. We’ve sent information about the code.


    XML Product Upgrade

    Using Quantum XML feeds to upgrade products


    The magnet concept can be applied to new products. Again, the solution is to re-arrange existing elements and create something new.

    Let’s take a software package like Excel. There are tools that allow users to read hints and ideas; and also provide feedback to Microsoft. The information goes back and forth.

    What could be done is create a platform and software package on how to change the feed and change features without transferring any code.

    Rather, the external signals would tell the internal conductor how to re-arrange the elements.

    In this case, there would already be embedded commands that recognize a signal as “add another element to this drop-down menu” or “re-do this procedure to verify that it actually displays as the user expects.”

    This approach to software upgrades would depend on the coding functions to be broken down into their basic elements; and design the platform to accept changes to the eternal functions without a change in the code, just a notification to create new elements from that which has already been designed.

    This approach would be permission based to rearrange tools and elements within the platform. The software vendor could assign specific codes, and randomize them on some unique patterns so that only the vendor could access them.

    Quantum XML

    Think of Quantum physics. When there are two separated objects, there can be a relationship between the two. The same principle applies in this case.

    The sender-vendor would operate along one set of parameters; and the product-receiver would operate independently; however, they would both cross-communicate at times unknown to anyone else, but they would then communicate status and how to rearrange the basic elements.

    Essentially what we’re talking about is using a Trojan Horse for good. The receiver’s protocol is already inside the template.

    An external signal would direct the internal elements to rearrange. The signal would go from an external source, sent by coded message on an XML feed, and the conductor within the platform would direct the code.

    The two sets of signals would be randomized uniquely and coordinated without a direct connection. The protocol could be integrated with new products.

    Let me say that again for the enterprise crowd. This protocol could be integrated with new products. It would enhance the product, not compete with it. The vendor could sell the code, rather than selling software.

    This is where XML comes in. XML would be the platform to send and receive these product upgrade codes. The advantage is that we’d have less distribution of software, but greater numbers of sales.

    The lessons from the RIAA and music industry would need to be applied: How to share the upgrades so that they are unique to a single end-user, but so that all users would have their unique code that performs the same function. This is where matching, time-limits, and exact coding comes in.

    How this is accomplished

    Here are the basic steps to accomplish this objective. Again, we’re talking about converting a simple tag-phrase into multiple steps; then assigning Java, HTML, or XML code to that single command.

    Here are the basic steps generated from this single command:


    Auto-generated XML Quantum Commands

  • Basic building blocks are identified, created, saved in platform
  • Duplicate, replicate function activated, tested
  • Confirm interface between internal and external platforms
  • New functions created using basic elements within the platform
  • Functions assigned xml-wifi code; sent to conductor; conductor assigns elements to match xml-wifi code;
  • Program executes.


  • See how easy that is? No cross platform coding. No security issues. Just sending information about the code. Just like an MRI and magnetic field work.

    There are many language translation tools. This tool would translate blogger comments into executable code that could be automatically injected into their blogging templates.

    Your wish is now an XML command.
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