07 March 2005

XML Link Map: Injecting an external framework on existing content for searching, indexing and referencing

Solving the “Valuable ideas without structure” problem

Summary

This tool would apply a structure to old content, and then allow others to quickly link to the individual elements. No extra code would have to be added to the platform or original content; rather the tools would immediately jump to this concept, and allow others to rely on these jumps.


Discussion


If you have a large blog, it can be difficult to find things. Especially when the earlier content only brushes on the later terms.

If you’ve discussed many things, sometimes the content overlaps, but you don’t necessarily use the standard-terms until, well…they become standardized.

Does that mean your old content is worthless? Of course not, as it still have valuable ideas.

I don’t mind directing readers to similar content. The problem becomes when it takes longer to index than to create new content.

The last thing I want to do is start hunting through my content and creating new links in old content. It takes time to manually re-add a specific code, then reconfirm that the links work, republish.

I’d rather have a find-and-discover tool, rather than a link-pulled tool. Something that I can direct and do the work, as opposed to something that I have to actively pull with a single tag.


Challenge


If we have one blog with multiple tags, links, subheadings; and we have a different blog-spot with other tags and links, it would be nice if there was a way to cross-index these.

The problem becomes troubling when we’re talking about concepts, not specific word. The same blogger could be describing the same concept, but from several different perspectives. What’s needed is a method that will identify these differently-named but similar-concepts.

  • 1. Fluid terms

    Content publishers often don’t know how their content will get indexed, or which words or tags will become popular.

    Even as content is finalized on large websites, content creators don’t have the overall picture how their readers will value the information.

    Links and tags can be limited: Users have to pre-define these links. It’s difficult to predict the likely relationships and naming structures when the content that hasn’t been created, much less imagined.

  • 2. Large databases

    Multiple entries can be difficult to index prospectively; and retroactive content-indexes do not exist.

    Multiple cross references can be helpful. They point readers to other content. They can also be a hassle when trying to see the overall relationships. When you have 100 or so links, it can be a mess.

    In the real world, this is called the internet. But for blogs, there isn’t a similar system.


    An automated indexing system


    What’s needed is a method to identify the old concepts and dovetail them with the current nomenclature.

    What would be nice is if there was a method to find relationships in the content, and also have a faster way to both index and link to similar content.

    What I’d like is a tool that will help me find, create, and jump to these similar concepts in my own content. I don’t want to have to spend the time creating new links to old content; nor do I want to write special codes to scroll down so far on a given log.

    Rather, I’d like to have an automated process to do what I have to manually do: Find similar concepts; create auto-links; create an overall picture of my content; and allow me to quickly link readers to similar content.


    Limitations with current approaches


    One approach is Mooter which visually maps the overall pages. But this doesn’t go into individual content-elements; nor does it allow that framework to be applied to another use.

    Another approach is for the user to add multiple links in a footnote format. This can take quite a bit of time, especially with multiple pages and links.

    A third approach is to inject auto-scrolling from one link to another. But this doesn’t do anything to give an overall picture, merely accelerates the speed of arriving at more content, not an overall pattern.

    One limitation is that some code doesn’t permit cross-platform linking. This shouldn’t apply. The site owner would own all the content. However, if we are going between systems, but there is one single owner, it becomes more problematic.

    However, a single owner may own the content on multiple platforms. Also Jybe does permit cross-platform sharing in browsers. Aggregators and blogs could have the same capability. Why not create a tool to quickly integrate all the previous unlinked content?


    Tool to meet the following challenges

  • Retroactively review the content, assign links and tags, then index and visually map the relationships;

  • Create an architecture for others to use this new structure as a framework to discover, index, and link to differently-named but similar content;

  • Jump externally to content with thesaurus-similar tags;

  • Break down the content by word and individual concept;

  • Create a content-index for the vast quantity of data;

  • Visually map the links;

  • Extract these cross references, create a map, and then group the results with clickable access; and

  • Map these internal links, take the content linked at the scroll, tag, label and index the information, and create a map of all the link-scrolls.


    XML Link Map

    Visual map of content cross-references


    Vision: A Hovering architecture

    Think of a large, open field with many pieces of paper. This tool would hover over that field and highlight the content that is similar.

    From afar, we could see the structure in the field. Not because the field has been organized, but because the overall organizing structure above that field is generalized and clear. Similar content could be colored similarly.

    The associations would be both special and color. We could visually see the relationships; and within those relationships, we could also see the terms and concepts that were more alike based on their color-similarities.

    Concepts that were more closely related or almost matching could have more similarly shaded tags; while that content that was less related would have a less intense color assigned.


    User requirements


    This tool would retroactively create, discover, index new tags, new patterns, and similar concepts. This tool would discover, map, link to similar content with in the blog. This tool would:

  • catalog the existing content into groups; then
  • find similar concepts, products, function, and tasks, then
  • show a picture in 3-D of the tags
  • link multiple chunks of information
  • display how the concepts were similar or overlap


    Summary

    This tool would enter a site or blog with many different entries, and then create a single map of all the content.

    This map could be referred to, and also applied to the site.

    This tool would retroactively apply searchable tags and links to the content. This would ensure that tags are not finalized, but can be updated easily and remain searchable to external indexes.

    Users would not have to spend time agonizing over which tag to use, and simply create content. The tool would create the tags and the overall links.

    The nice thing is that this tool would allow the users to find new patterns in their own content.

    Ideally, these maps and content-links could be compared with other content-publishers to see overlaps, similar terms, or other methods used to describe similar processes, procedures or concepts.

    Users would not have to create new links, nor write new code to go to specific tags. Rather, they would simply refer to the central-index which would automatically jump to the content, links, and newly created tags.

    Acknowledgements

    Ref: Rashmi Sinha, for a really nice picture.

    Del.icio.us related tags: HubMed for a really nifty 3-D display.


    LEGAL NOTICE


    Creative Commons License

    This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License.

    You may not copy any of this work to promote a commercial product on any site or medium in the universe.

    If you see this work posted on a commercial site, it violates the creative commons license; and the author does not endorse the commercial product.

    Free to use for non-commercial uses. Link to this original blogspot and cite as .
  • Solving the “Valuable ideas without structure” problem

    Summary

    This tool would apply a structure to old content, and then allow others to quickly link to the individual elements. No extra code would have to be added to the platform or original content; rather the tools would immediately jump to this concept, and allow others to rely on these jumps.


    Discussion


    If you have a large blog, it can be difficult to find things. Especially when the earlier content only brushes on the later terms.

    If you’ve discussed many things, sometimes the content overlaps, but you don’t necessarily use the standard-terms until, well…they become standardized.

    Does that mean your old content is worthless? Of course not, as it still have valuable ideas.

    I don’t mind directing readers to similar content. The problem becomes when it takes longer to index than to create new content.

    The last thing I want to do is start hunting through my content and creating new links in old content. It takes time to manually re-add a specific code, then reconfirm that the links work, republish.

    I’d rather have a find-and-discover tool, rather than a link-pulled tool. Something that I can direct and do the work, as opposed to something that I have to actively pull with a single tag.


    Challenge


    If we have one blog with multiple tags, links, subheadings; and we have a different blog-spot with other tags and links, it would be nice if there was a way to cross-index these.

    The problem becomes troubling when we’re talking about concepts, not specific word. The same blogger could be describing the same concept, but from several different perspectives. What’s needed is a method that will identify these differently-named but similar-concepts.

  • 1. Fluid terms

    Content publishers often don’t know how their content will get indexed, or which words or tags will become popular.

    Even as content is finalized on large websites, content creators don’t have the overall picture how their readers will value the information.

    Links and tags can be limited: Users have to pre-define these links. It’s difficult to predict the likely relationships and naming structures when the content that hasn’t been created, much less imagined.

  • 2. Large databases

    Multiple entries can be difficult to index prospectively; and retroactive content-indexes do not exist.

    Multiple cross references can be helpful. They point readers to other content. They can also be a hassle when trying to see the overall relationships. When you have 100 or so links, it can be a mess.

    In the real world, this is called the internet. But for blogs, there isn’t a similar system.


    An automated indexing system


    What’s needed is a method to identify the old concepts and dovetail them with the current nomenclature.

    What would be nice is if there was a method to find relationships in the content, and also have a faster way to both index and link to similar content.

    What I’d like is a tool that will help me find, create, and jump to these similar concepts in my own content. I don’t want to have to spend the time creating new links to old content; nor do I want to write special codes to scroll down so far on a given log.

    Rather, I’d like to have an automated process to do what I have to manually do: Find similar concepts; create auto-links; create an overall picture of my content; and allow me to quickly link readers to similar content.


    Limitations with current approaches


    One approach is Mooter which visually maps the overall pages. But this doesn’t go into individual content-elements; nor does it allow that framework to be applied to another use.

    Another approach is for the user to add multiple links in a footnote format. This can take quite a bit of time, especially with multiple pages and links.

    A third approach is to inject auto-scrolling from one link to another. But this doesn’t do anything to give an overall picture, merely accelerates the speed of arriving at more content, not an overall pattern.

    One limitation is that some code doesn’t permit cross-platform linking. This shouldn’t apply. The site owner would own all the content. However, if we are going between systems, but there is one single owner, it becomes more problematic.

    However, a single owner may own the content on multiple platforms. Also Jybe does permit cross-platform sharing in browsers. Aggregators and blogs could have the same capability. Why not create a tool to quickly integrate all the previous unlinked content?


    Tool to meet the following challenges

  • Retroactively review the content, assign links and tags, then index and visually map the relationships;

  • Create an architecture for others to use this new structure as a framework to discover, index, and link to differently-named but similar content;

  • Jump externally to content with thesaurus-similar tags;

  • Break down the content by word and individual concept;

  • Create a content-index for the vast quantity of data;

  • Visually map the links;

  • Extract these cross references, create a map, and then group the results with clickable access; and

  • Map these internal links, take the content linked at the scroll, tag, label and index the information, and create a map of all the link-scrolls.


    XML Link Map

    Visual map of content cross-references


    Vision: A Hovering architecture

    Think of a large, open field with many pieces of paper. This tool would hover over that field and highlight the content that is similar.

    From afar, we could see the structure in the field. Not because the field has been organized, but because the overall organizing structure above that field is generalized and clear. Similar content could be colored similarly.

    The associations would be both special and color. We could visually see the relationships; and within those relationships, we could also see the terms and concepts that were more alike based on their color-similarities.

    Concepts that were more closely related or almost matching could have more similarly shaded tags; while that content that was less related would have a less intense color assigned.


    User requirements


    This tool would retroactively create, discover, index new tags, new patterns, and similar concepts. This tool would discover, map, link to similar content with in the blog. This tool would:

  • catalog the existing content into groups; then
  • find similar concepts, products, function, and tasks, then
  • show a picture in 3-D of the tags
  • link multiple chunks of information
  • display how the concepts were similar or overlap


    Summary

    This tool would enter a site or blog with many different entries, and then create a single map of all the content.

    This map could be referred to, and also applied to the site.

    This tool would retroactively apply searchable tags and links to the content. This would ensure that tags are not finalized, but can be updated easily and remain searchable to external indexes.

    Users would not have to spend time agonizing over which tag to use, and simply create content. The tool would create the tags and the overall links.

    The nice thing is that this tool would allow the users to find new patterns in their own content.

    Ideally, these maps and content-links could be compared with other content-publishers to see overlaps, similar terms, or other methods used to describe similar processes, procedures or concepts.

    Users would not have to create new links, nor write new code to go to specific tags. Rather, they would simply refer to the central-index which would automatically jump to the content, links, and newly created tags.

    Acknowledgements

    Ref: Rashmi Sinha, for a really nice picture.

    Del.icio.us related tags: HubMed for a really nifty 3-D display.


    LEGAL NOTICE


    Creative Commons License

    This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License.

    You may not copy any of this work to promote a commercial product on any site or medium in the universe.

    If you see this work posted on a commercial site, it violates the creative commons license; and the author does not endorse the commercial product.

    Free to use for non-commercial uses. Link to this original blogspot and cite as .
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