08 April 2005

Making it simple

People get intimidated by computers. They don't like all the steps. They want it simple.

What developers can do is take users to the correct information and content. With one click.

Think about macros and wizards. They combined many steps into one-click. There needs to be the same for XML and subscriptions.

And those macros need to be web-based, not something that requires many steps to download. For that matter why make it a download and not simply a standard?

Some complaint that macros and wizards are too confusing, or that people want to be able to go to the preliminary steps.

I'm not seeing an open mind. If that's a credible argument, why aren't those same developers then creating one-step tools to make them simple, or give users the option to go the preliminary steps?

If there's a real problem, why aren't developers then using IT to solve that problem? I find it curious. The users come forward with ideas. And the developers dream of new ways to justify why nothing has been done. That's backwards looking.

Developers seem like they're not happy sometimes. That no matter what suggestion they get, they take it as a personal insult. As if the public should be happy that the developer has 90% of the job done. Unfortunately, the last 10% is all the frustration.

I would like to see more one-step solutions in XML. And more macros in the aggregators. Ever noticed how an aggregator has many menus, but very few buttons like windows? Why not include more colorful one-click buttons for those multiple-steps all users have to take.

  • How many steps does it take to do a ping, trackback, enter link into blog, then send the content for publication?

  • Why do the blog-platforms seem to think that links are the way to go; why not have those macros and multiple-step-tasks incorporated into more buttons that integrate with the browser?

  • Why aren't the computers starting with the question, "What do I want to do" and then giving me some buttons as one-step-options to complete the task.

    My goal is not to surf my dashboard and operating system looking for more tasks to complete. My goal is the opposite: To spend less time on technology, and more time doing what I want.

    Technology is not the goal or the means. It is just a tool or box to help get me to where I want to go. The less time I have to mess with it, the happier I am.

    I'm looking for a solution. And the solution isn't technology. I'm the solution. I have to do the work. I want the developers to remember my real goal isn't to spend more time on their platform using their tool.

    My real goal is to do what I want. In real life. Where there are real things.

    One step is nice. Why not make the next generation of XML tools and platforms. The same. Nice, not frustrating.

    Don't make the "help" more annoying than what I had before: Nothing.

    I'll gladly choose to do without.

    Stop saying, "can't" or "that's too hard." Just do it.

    No, I'm not going to say "Thanks" and "you're doing a great job." You should be thanking me. For putting up with your nonsense and not switching off this technology a long time ago.
  • People get intimidated by computers. They don't like all the steps. They want it simple.

    What developers can do is take users to the correct information and content. With one click.

    Think about macros and wizards. They combined many steps into one-click. There needs to be the same for XML and subscriptions.

    And those macros need to be web-based, not something that requires many steps to download. For that matter why make it a download and not simply a standard?

    Some complaint that macros and wizards are too confusing, or that people want to be able to go to the preliminary steps.

    I'm not seeing an open mind. If that's a credible argument, why aren't those same developers then creating one-step tools to make them simple, or give users the option to go the preliminary steps?

    If there's a real problem, why aren't developers then using IT to solve that problem? I find it curious. The users come forward with ideas. And the developers dream of new ways to justify why nothing has been done. That's backwards looking.

    Developers seem like they're not happy sometimes. That no matter what suggestion they get, they take it as a personal insult. As if the public should be happy that the developer has 90% of the job done. Unfortunately, the last 10% is all the frustration.

    I would like to see more one-step solutions in XML. And more macros in the aggregators. Ever noticed how an aggregator has many menus, but very few buttons like windows? Why not include more colorful one-click buttons for those multiple-steps all users have to take.

  • How many steps does it take to do a ping, trackback, enter link into blog, then send the content for publication?

  • Why do the blog-platforms seem to think that links are the way to go; why not have those macros and multiple-step-tasks incorporated into more buttons that integrate with the browser?

  • Why aren't the computers starting with the question, "What do I want to do" and then giving me some buttons as one-step-options to complete the task.

    My goal is not to surf my dashboard and operating system looking for more tasks to complete. My goal is the opposite: To spend less time on technology, and more time doing what I want.

    Technology is not the goal or the means. It is just a tool or box to help get me to where I want to go. The less time I have to mess with it, the happier I am.

    I'm looking for a solution. And the solution isn't technology. I'm the solution. I have to do the work. I want the developers to remember my real goal isn't to spend more time on their platform using their tool.

    My real goal is to do what I want. In real life. Where there are real things.

    One step is nice. Why not make the next generation of XML tools and platforms. The same. Nice, not frustrating.

    Don't make the "help" more annoying than what I had before: Nothing.

    I'll gladly choose to do without.

    Stop saying, "can't" or "that's too hard." Just do it.

    No, I'm not going to say "Thanks" and "you're doing a great job." You should be thanking me. For putting up with your nonsense and not switching off this technology a long time ago.
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