15 April 2005

Weather warnings and XML

According to the Dallas Morning News, the US's National Weather Service is cutting back: Less money for forecasters.

I find it curious that great world attention is given to Tsunamis; yet the events that are most likely to cause damage are not Tsunamis, but day to day weather events. It seems as though the priorities are, at best, misplaced.

To find information with XML tools, there must be a reasonable chance of the information; yet, comprehensive weather forecasts, reports, and documentation are less likely with manning cutbacks. It's not possible to do a prospective search on content that isn't there, and will never be there, because of manning cutbacks.

Questions

  • Will there be fewer forecasters providing information on storm warnings;

  • As an alternative, will there be an effort to send information through XML; or

  • Is the problem with forecasting personnel, and nothing to do with XML prospective searches?

  • Does the United States' weather service hope to outsource the weather forecasting to other countries?

  • On the publishing-warning side, do countries plan on using automated bots to create the SMS warnings; and then at the consuming side, use bots to find the automate forecasts?

    Let's hope the bots don't take over. If they do, the only thing during a time of budget cutbacks that may keep people up to date with human-reports is an unofficial system of weather stations. Manned by, you guessed it, bloggers.

  • According to the Dallas Morning News, the US's National Weather Service is cutting back: Less money for forecasters.

    I find it curious that great world attention is given to Tsunamis; yet the events that are most likely to cause damage are not Tsunamis, but day to day weather events. It seems as though the priorities are, at best, misplaced.

    To find information with XML tools, there must be a reasonable chance of the information; yet, comprehensive weather forecasts, reports, and documentation are less likely with manning cutbacks. It's not possible to do a prospective search on content that isn't there, and will never be there, because of manning cutbacks.

    Questions

  • Will there be fewer forecasters providing information on storm warnings;

  • As an alternative, will there be an effort to send information through XML; or

  • Is the problem with forecasting personnel, and nothing to do with XML prospective searches?

  • Does the United States' weather service hope to outsource the weather forecasting to other countries?

  • On the publishing-warning side, do countries plan on using automated bots to create the SMS warnings; and then at the consuming side, use bots to find the automate forecasts?

    Let's hope the bots don't take over. If they do, the only thing during a time of budget cutbacks that may keep people up to date with human-reports is an unofficial system of weather stations. Manned by, you guessed it, bloggers.

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