18 April 2005

XML Concepts: Organizing newly created feeds containing unfamiliar content

I've noticed that as much as we might try, the feed folders never seem to capture the really good stuff we ultimately want.

Also, I've noticed that prospective searches are limited in that we have to know in advance what we want.

But this isn't how life works. We kind of muddle through, get content thrown at us, and then realize we need to look for something new.

But who has the time to keep reloading new terms into search engines?

What I'd really like is a system that will automatically find new stuff, index and folder it based on some meaningful patterns, and then show case the material for me in an organized way.

The problem with tags, feeds, and searches as this indexing system only works going backwards or for known content. But we don't have an indexing and archiving system that works with new terms or content hat is unrelated to anything else.

Yet, despite this gap, the content still shows up and we still get inundated with information that really doesn't match "the new stuff" that we really need to be watching.


XML Trawler

Organizing disorganized content


Think of a ship that is dragging a fishing net. Pretend this net is very attractive to fish.

Now, think of a place where these incoming feeds would be first captured, then redirected.

This isn't the same as Newsgator Headlines. What this tool does is senses what is out there in the blogosphere, and attracts the "good stuff that is new" [and not yet part of a prospective search].

Then the tool would index this "new content that has no name or category" and assign it to tags, folders, or some indexing system that others could find.

The goal of this system is not to find what exists, or find something using common terms; rather it is a way to organize new information that has no familiar terms.

The tool would work by noticing how the net below the craft interacted with the newly created feeds; and then see how the incoming content reacted to the capture tools.

Kind of like how a magnet works around metal objects. We don't necessarily focus just on the objects, but also how the waves between the magnet and the object are oscillating over time.

These oscillations with "new things" can be indicators of the nature of the content, its properties. Kind of like indexing new terms and related-tags, even though we don't have the tags yet indexed or defined.

Notice how the content relates to our attempt to measure how it interacts with our indexing tools. The patterns of indexing [or non-indexing] can say alot about new content, especially when we have a system in place to measure and monitor "what doesn't yet fit."
I've noticed that as much as we might try, the feed folders never seem to capture the really good stuff we ultimately want.

Also, I've noticed that prospective searches are limited in that we have to know in advance what we want.

But this isn't how life works. We kind of muddle through, get content thrown at us, and then realize we need to look for something new.

But who has the time to keep reloading new terms into search engines?

What I'd really like is a system that will automatically find new stuff, index and folder it based on some meaningful patterns, and then show case the material for me in an organized way.

The problem with tags, feeds, and searches as this indexing system only works going backwards or for known content. But we don't have an indexing and archiving system that works with new terms or content hat is unrelated to anything else.

Yet, despite this gap, the content still shows up and we still get inundated with information that really doesn't match "the new stuff" that we really need to be watching.


XML Trawler

Organizing disorganized content


Think of a ship that is dragging a fishing net. Pretend this net is very attractive to fish.

Now, think of a place where these incoming feeds would be first captured, then redirected.

This isn't the same as Newsgator Headlines. What this tool does is senses what is out there in the blogosphere, and attracts the "good stuff that is new" [and not yet part of a prospective search].

Then the tool would index this "new content that has no name or category" and assign it to tags, folders, or some indexing system that others could find.

The goal of this system is not to find what exists, or find something using common terms; rather it is a way to organize new information that has no familiar terms.

The tool would work by noticing how the net below the craft interacted with the newly created feeds; and then see how the incoming content reacted to the capture tools.

Kind of like how a magnet works around metal objects. We don't necessarily focus just on the objects, but also how the waves between the magnet and the object are oscillating over time.

These oscillations with "new things" can be indicators of the nature of the content, its properties. Kind of like indexing new terms and related-tags, even though we don't have the tags yet indexed or defined.

Notice how the content relates to our attempt to measure how it interacts with our indexing tools. The patterns of indexing [or non-indexing] can say alot about new content, especially when we have a system in place to measure and monitor "what doesn't yet fit."
" />