01 June 2005

Weighting assigned to RSS search elements

I thought I would pass on an observation. It has to do with searching, RSS, and search engines.

Have you ever noticed in a search engine that the list of returns is very long?

Sometimes, the list is so long, that all I have to do is add one variable, and the results get very small or go to zero.

Also, I've noticed that sometimes when I add new elements to the search string, that I'd still like to keep the "minor items" associated with the "less known variables" highlighted/showecased at the beginning of the search-results, but then dovetail the two results into a single search.

This is another way of saying, "even though I've added a new variable, and this new variable tends to overshadow the old results with many returns, I'd still like to get some better visibility to the returns associated with the variable that originally generated a very short list of returns."

In case you missed it: I'll say it another way:

Let's suppose you have a search routine with the word, "Rock 44" in it. [I'm just making it up].

Then let's suppose you have an idea: You want to tweak those results, and add a new variable "just to see what you get". So you throw in a very broad term like "Yellow."

Now, suppose you do a combined search with "Rock 44" [narrow] and "yellow" [broad]. what shows up first?

That's right: Yellow-related returns.

But that's not what I want. I want the two search-routines interwoven but I want to ensure that the 'really specific stuff with Rock 44" gets more weight, and jumps to the head of the list.

I've been thinking about this, and have an idea.

What if there is some weighting in the variables. What if I could assign a precedence to the search results so that even though I add a very broad term, my very narrow term still sends these related to "rock 44" to the top of the list.

Because that's what I really want: Rock 44, but with some new shading. I still want to see the Rock44 outputs, but I also want to see which of the Rock 44 elements have Yellow in them. Conversely, I don't care about Yellow, and I don't care that many people are talking about Yellow.

So I want to see something that allows me to define the order of the results in terms of weights; and I want to be able to make the order of the search string important.

This sis to say that if I put "rock 44" before "yellow" then my first interest/first mentioned word should "have the option" to be placed first on my search results.

Again, that most people are talking about yellow and linking to yellow is irrelevant to my interest and focus on Rock44.

All I care about is getting something that highlights what I want, not highlighted what everyone else thinks is important.

Thanks for the link ranks anyway.

-- This is the end of the content --
I thought I would pass on an observation. It has to do with searching, RSS, and search engines.

Have you ever noticed in a search engine that the list of returns is very long?

Sometimes, the list is so long, that all I have to do is add one variable, and the results get very small or go to zero.

Also, I've noticed that sometimes when I add new elements to the search string, that I'd still like to keep the "minor items" associated with the "less known variables" highlighted/showecased at the beginning of the search-results, but then dovetail the two results into a single search.

This is another way of saying, "even though I've added a new variable, and this new variable tends to overshadow the old results with many returns, I'd still like to get some better visibility to the returns associated with the variable that originally generated a very short list of returns."

In case you missed it: I'll say it another way:

Let's suppose you have a search routine with the word, "Rock 44" in it. [I'm just making it up].

Then let's suppose you have an idea: You want to tweak those results, and add a new variable "just to see what you get". So you throw in a very broad term like "Yellow."

Now, suppose you do a combined search with "Rock 44" [narrow] and "yellow" [broad]. what shows up first?

That's right: Yellow-related returns.

But that's not what I want. I want the two search-routines interwoven but I want to ensure that the 'really specific stuff with Rock 44" gets more weight, and jumps to the head of the list.

I've been thinking about this, and have an idea.

What if there is some weighting in the variables. What if I could assign a precedence to the search results so that even though I add a very broad term, my very narrow term still sends these related to "rock 44" to the top of the list.

Because that's what I really want: Rock 44, but with some new shading. I still want to see the Rock44 outputs, but I also want to see which of the Rock 44 elements have Yellow in them. Conversely, I don't care about Yellow, and I don't care that many people are talking about Yellow.

So I want to see something that allows me to define the order of the results in terms of weights; and I want to be able to make the order of the search string important.

This sis to say that if I put "rock 44" before "yellow" then my first interest/first mentioned word should "have the option" to be placed first on my search results.

Again, that most people are talking about yellow and linking to yellow is irrelevant to my interest and focus on Rock44.

All I care about is getting something that highlights what I want, not highlighted what everyone else thinks is important.

Thanks for the link ranks anyway.

-- This is the end of the content --
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