17 August 2005

Blog URL auto-redirect log

Have you ever changed a blog title?

If you have, you know that some of your readers can't find your content: Your URL has changed, but the original feed has the original URL.

Some of the feed readers use the original URL. If you make an update to that URL, the original feed doesn't necessarily change. Rather, the original URL may still be available or floating around. What's worse: When you've got a spelling error, and months later, you notice it/change it, but the world is using the old URL.

What to do? It would be nice . . .

If there was a way to have an auto-redirect capability. But not just that, but a way to automatically allow users the option to have this auto-redirect on or off. That way, if someone makes a change to a URL, and doesn't want anyone to link back to the original content, then they can turn it off.

Here's what I see happening:

  • A. Someone publishes content

  • B. They make an update to the blog URL

  • C. There is an auto-redirect from the original URL to the new one

  • D. The users can turn the option on or off.

  • E. There is a log or central registry in a blogger's account for all the auto-redirects. If there are changes, or content is deleted this would show up as a "permanently deleted" as opposed to a "redirect"

    That way:

  • We can publish once, and then have updates to the URL automatically linked from the original Feed URL to the subsequent changes.

  • If we publish an XML feed, and the URL changes, the feed-readers will be able to link the original feed URL with the updated URL and still be able to link from the first version of the content to the latest URL.

  • We would have an auto-link between the new and old URL with all versions of the blog title in the XML feed.

    Ideally, this log or auto-link function would also apply to all internal-blog-references of that particular URL. We may have entered in the HTML code the original blog-URL, but the auto-redirect would automatically update and index both versions of the URL in the blogroll, archive, internal blog links, and the XML tags.

    -- This is the end of the content --
  • Have you ever changed a blog title?

    If you have, you know that some of your readers can't find your content: Your URL has changed, but the original feed has the original URL.

    Some of the feed readers use the original URL. If you make an update to that URL, the original feed doesn't necessarily change. Rather, the original URL may still be available or floating around. What's worse: When you've got a spelling error, and months later, you notice it/change it, but the world is using the old URL.

    What to do? It would be nice . . .

    If there was a way to have an auto-redirect capability. But not just that, but a way to automatically allow users the option to have this auto-redirect on or off. That way, if someone makes a change to a URL, and doesn't want anyone to link back to the original content, then they can turn it off.

    Here's what I see happening:

  • A. Someone publishes content

  • B. They make an update to the blog URL

  • C. There is an auto-redirect from the original URL to the new one

  • D. The users can turn the option on or off.

  • E. There is a log or central registry in a blogger's account for all the auto-redirects. If there are changes, or content is deleted this would show up as a "permanently deleted" as opposed to a "redirect"

    That way:

  • We can publish once, and then have updates to the URL automatically linked from the original Feed URL to the subsequent changes.

  • If we publish an XML feed, and the URL changes, the feed-readers will be able to link the original feed URL with the updated URL and still be able to link from the first version of the content to the latest URL.

  • We would have an auto-link between the new and old URL with all versions of the blog title in the XML feed.

    Ideally, this log or auto-link function would also apply to all internal-blog-references of that particular URL. We may have entered in the HTML code the original blog-URL, but the auto-redirect would automatically update and index both versions of the URL in the blogroll, archive, internal blog links, and the XML tags.

    -- This is the end of the content --
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