11 November 2005

RSS Community's "Use our service, put up with our insults"

A nice concept, but flawed in execution.

I've noticed this with TechnorHiding: They promote to no end, and have their logo on magazines like NewsWehuk, but when you verify whether the XML-feed is actually working with your content that comments on that original material, things don't show up.

I noticed this problem with PoupSoup: They lay it all out, what they're doing, but if you notice a problem, suddenly they throw it back on the customer.

Well, Blogher's doing the same: They have this spam-detection system which identifies blogs which have [wait for it] . . .
  • A. alot of words [someone who is thinking] or
  • B. duplicate content [BlogHer's coding error].

    We've previously identified this in May 2005, but the feature continues despite the manual logins and the public e-mail availability. What's up with that?

    Not only can anyone spam my blog [and claim stupidity about it], but when I post content, the blogher reports the content as spam, and requires the "manual override feature." Whatever.

    What makes it worse is that the "word verification process" jams up the letters and the c's, l's, and d's appear the same. Maybe you should issue us a magnifying glass with our sign-up; how abput this: Send us an advance payment through paypal so we can buy a mantifying glass, that way we can use your system . . . and maybe have ads.

    Develop-lupies

    Word to the wise: If you're going to go to the trouble of producing an XML product, the last thing you want to do is to blame your customers or make it more difficult for them to do the job.

    Not only does your product not work 'the way I want to use it,' but when I do use it the way "most people use things", we get it thrown back in our face.

    Not impressive, but we wouldn't expect anything else from the crappy XML developers.

    Here are the details:

    Comment on the Blogher Anti-SPam Spam:

    Perhaps if blogher had an automated code-correction feature, we could remedy the duplicate posting of content.

    Why does BlogHer allow the duplications of the text below?

    We have no idea.

    It would be nice if there was an automated feature for the public to find out which kind of blogging software has automated-blog-spam-detection that is faulty.

    Maybe BlogHer can improve their blogging-filtering system so that, unlike other blog software, we do not have to have someone "review" the content before posting:


    Spam from BlogHer


    Your blog requires word verification

    BlogHer's spam-prevention robots have detected that your blog has characteristics of a spam blog. (What's a spam blog?) Since you're an actual person reading this, your blog is probably not a spam blog. Automated spam detection is inherently fuzzy, and we sincerely apologize for this false positive.

    Before we can turn off mandatory word verification on your posts we'll need to have a human review your blog and verify that it is not a spam blog. Please fill out the form below to get a review.

    Find out more about how BlogHer is fighting spam blogs.

    Remove word verification from posts

    Word Verification:

    Type the characters you see in the picture below.

    Ref: This link below:

    About Spam Blogs

    What Are Spam Blogs?

    As with many powerful tools, blogging services can be both used and abused. The ease of creating and updating webpages with BlogHer has made it particularly prone to a form of behavior known as link spamming. Blogs engaged in this behavior are called spam blogs, and can be recognized by their irrelevant, repetitive, or nonsensical text, along with a large number of links, usually all pointing to a single site.

    Spam blogs cause various problems, beyond simply wasting a few seconds of your time when you happen to come across one. They can clog up search engines, making it difficult to find real content on the subjects that interest you. They may scrape content from other sites on the web, using other people's writing to make it look as though they have useful information of their own. And if an automated system is creating spam posts at an extremely high rate, it can impact the speed and quality of the service for other, legitimate users.

    BlogHer: "What We're Doing About Spam"

    Needless to say, we do not approve of spamming here at BlogHer. Below are some of the things we've implemented to remove and reduce spam on our service. We will update this list as we continue our efforts.

    Automated spam classifying algorithms keep spam blogs out of NextBlog and out of our "Recently Published" list on the dashboard.

    The same classifiers are used to require an extra word verification field on the posting form for potential spam blogs. This makes it harder for spammers to set up automated systems to do their posting, since a human needs to complete this step.
    The Flage as Object-shutup-able button in the NavyBarroom lets you notify us of problem blogs that you find, so we can review them and take appropriate action.




    You'll notice the content duplicates below: BlogHer-spam-detection is unable to figure out that it's own software is duplicating the content.

    Isn't that interesting: The system that "detects spam" can't figure out that it is creating spam.

    Why is that?

    "Don't notice what is going on, just nod your head and repeat, 'XML Is the best thing ever'."

    Whatever. I think it's alot of crap.

    How are those profit margins?

    "Now that we've developed all this XML-stuff, how are we going to make money at it?"

    Gee, why didn't you idiots think about that before you started spending money?

    Duh.

    -- This is the end of the content --
  • A nice concept, but flawed in execution.

    I've noticed this with TechnorHiding: They promote to no end, and have their logo on magazines like NewsWehuk, but when you verify whether the XML-feed is actually working with your content that comments on that original material, things don't show up.

    I noticed this problem with PoupSoup: They lay it all out, what they're doing, but if you notice a problem, suddenly they throw it back on the customer.

    Well, Blogher's doing the same: They have this spam-detection system which identifies blogs which have [wait for it] . . .
  • A. alot of words [someone who is thinking] or
  • B. duplicate content [BlogHer's coding error].

    We've previously identified this in May 2005, but the feature continues despite the manual logins and the public e-mail availability. What's up with that?

    Not only can anyone spam my blog [and claim stupidity about it], but when I post content, the blogher reports the content as spam, and requires the "manual override feature." Whatever.

    What makes it worse is that the "word verification process" jams up the letters and the c's, l's, and d's appear the same. Maybe you should issue us a magnifying glass with our sign-up; how abput this: Send us an advance payment through paypal so we can buy a mantifying glass, that way we can use your system . . . and maybe have ads.

    Develop-lupies

    Word to the wise: If you're going to go to the trouble of producing an XML product, the last thing you want to do is to blame your customers or make it more difficult for them to do the job.

    Not only does your product not work 'the way I want to use it,' but when I do use it the way "most people use things", we get it thrown back in our face.

    Not impressive, but we wouldn't expect anything else from the crappy XML developers.

    Here are the details:

    Comment on the Blogher Anti-SPam Spam:

    Perhaps if blogher had an automated code-correction feature, we could remedy the duplicate posting of content.

    Why does BlogHer allow the duplications of the text below?

    We have no idea.

    It would be nice if there was an automated feature for the public to find out which kind of blogging software has automated-blog-spam-detection that is faulty.

    Maybe BlogHer can improve their blogging-filtering system so that, unlike other blog software, we do not have to have someone "review" the content before posting:


    Spam from BlogHer


    Your blog requires word verification

    BlogHer's spam-prevention robots have detected that your blog has characteristics of a spam blog. (What's a spam blog?) Since you're an actual person reading this, your blog is probably not a spam blog. Automated spam detection is inherently fuzzy, and we sincerely apologize for this false positive.

    Before we can turn off mandatory word verification on your posts we'll need to have a human review your blog and verify that it is not a spam blog. Please fill out the form below to get a review.

    Find out more about how BlogHer is fighting spam blogs.

    Remove word verification from posts

    Word Verification:

    Type the characters you see in the picture below.

    Ref: This link below:

    About Spam Blogs

    What Are Spam Blogs?

    As with many powerful tools, blogging services can be both used and abused. The ease of creating and updating webpages with BlogHer has made it particularly prone to a form of behavior known as link spamming. Blogs engaged in this behavior are called spam blogs, and can be recognized by their irrelevant, repetitive, or nonsensical text, along with a large number of links, usually all pointing to a single site.

    Spam blogs cause various problems, beyond simply wasting a few seconds of your time when you happen to come across one. They can clog up search engines, making it difficult to find real content on the subjects that interest you. They may scrape content from other sites on the web, using other people's writing to make it look as though they have useful information of their own. And if an automated system is creating spam posts at an extremely high rate, it can impact the speed and quality of the service for other, legitimate users.

    BlogHer: "What We're Doing About Spam"

    Needless to say, we do not approve of spamming here at BlogHer. Below are some of the things we've implemented to remove and reduce spam on our service. We will update this list as we continue our efforts.

    Automated spam classifying algorithms keep spam blogs out of NextBlog and out of our "Recently Published" list on the dashboard.

    The same classifiers are used to require an extra word verification field on the posting form for potential spam blogs. This makes it harder for spammers to set up automated systems to do their posting, since a human needs to complete this step.
    The Flage as Object-shutup-able button in the NavyBarroom lets you notify us of problem blogs that you find, so we can review them and take appropriate action.




    You'll notice the content duplicates below: BlogHer-spam-detection is unable to figure out that it's own software is duplicating the content.

    Isn't that interesting: The system that "detects spam" can't figure out that it is creating spam.

    Why is that?

    "Don't notice what is going on, just nod your head and repeat, 'XML Is the best thing ever'."

    Whatever. I think it's alot of crap.

    How are those profit margins?

    "Now that we've developed all this XML-stuff, how are we going to make money at it?"

    Gee, why didn't you idiots think about that before you started spending money?

    Duh.

    -- This is the end of the content --
    " />