03 April 2006

Technorati Visual Mapping of Results: Not just links, but the arguments

Now I've finally figured out what most annoys me about the internet and search engines: It is a list of text. And I've finally figured out what I would prefer: It's a visual map. But I'm not talking about a map of the links; rather, something deeper.

There's a key word search. Technorati has a similar-word search, where you see a visual map. What would be nice . . .. . Apply this technique to the aggregate of a specific search.

For example, let's suppose that I'm looking up a specific topic, and find that there's a Washingtpost Article [WaPo], which shows the technorati-found blogs on that subject. What would be nice is if I could click on that link at WaPo, and see something more than the blogs. Rather, it would be nice if there was a summary chart, that listed the words and arguments.

I realize this is quite a leap. But the issue is that I would prefer to see a map of arguments and main points. Remember, I'm not interested in links, sites, or a list. Rather, I'd like to get the tools to strip out the fluff, and provide a single snapshot of the content by main points and arguments.

Obviously, how this is done remains to be seen. What I would like to be able to do with this summary chart is:

A. move things around

B. see how a particular comment, word, argument is clustered -- and see whether it is novel, unique, or well supported

In short, I'd like a faster way to see the various view points, then have a method to move the arguments to either a "pro" or "con" on a particular issue. What I see happening is with time there might be a mechanism to allow Technorati to have multiple search results -- and then I can combine all the arguments/outputs from three searches, into a single map.

That way I can see the summary of three different views or questions related to an issue. Then with time, I can see whether the terms and arguments I'm getting are or are not adding novel arguments. If I'm not getting new arguments, and I'm looking at the close, then I may choose to stop the search. However, if I add a single word, and get a number of new arguments -- then I might realize that I need to use some synonyms, and continue adjusting my searches to better match what others are using.

Summary

I like the ability to quickly find out who's talking about a particular news article. What I'd like to see is a transition from links and lists to something that focuses on words, arguments, and methods to consolidated arguments into patterns and groups that will help me make stronger points.

I'd like to be able to move arguments around, and move the beset ones to the top, then have the results quickly integrate with an external word processing product: That way I'm essentially taking the RSS-MXL-products/information and forcing it to interact seamlessly with an external software product like Excel, PowerPoint, or word. Plus, it would be nice if I could quickly transport the summary argument table, and quickly-simultaneously have the links go with that information in some sort of format that I define for footnoting, citation, or cross references.


-- This is the end of the content --
Now I've finally figured out what most annoys me about the internet and search engines: It is a list of text. And I've finally figured out what I would prefer: It's a visual map. But I'm not talking about a map of the links; rather, something deeper.

There's a key word search. Technorati has a similar-word search, where you see a visual map. What would be nice . . .. . Apply this technique to the aggregate of a specific search.

For example, let's suppose that I'm looking up a specific topic, and find that there's a Washingtpost Article [WaPo], which shows the technorati-found blogs on that subject. What would be nice is if I could click on that link at WaPo, and see something more than the blogs. Rather, it would be nice if there was a summary chart, that listed the words and arguments.

I realize this is quite a leap. But the issue is that I would prefer to see a map of arguments and main points. Remember, I'm not interested in links, sites, or a list. Rather, I'd like to get the tools to strip out the fluff, and provide a single snapshot of the content by main points and arguments.

Obviously, how this is done remains to be seen. What I would like to be able to do with this summary chart is:

A. move things around

B. see how a particular comment, word, argument is clustered -- and see whether it is novel, unique, or well supported

In short, I'd like a faster way to see the various view points, then have a method to move the arguments to either a "pro" or "con" on a particular issue. What I see happening is with time there might be a mechanism to allow Technorati to have multiple search results -- and then I can combine all the arguments/outputs from three searches, into a single map.

That way I can see the summary of three different views or questions related to an issue. Then with time, I can see whether the terms and arguments I'm getting are or are not adding novel arguments. If I'm not getting new arguments, and I'm looking at the close, then I may choose to stop the search. However, if I add a single word, and get a number of new arguments -- then I might realize that I need to use some synonyms, and continue adjusting my searches to better match what others are using.

Summary

I like the ability to quickly find out who's talking about a particular news article. What I'd like to see is a transition from links and lists to something that focuses on words, arguments, and methods to consolidated arguments into patterns and groups that will help me make stronger points.

I'd like to be able to move arguments around, and move the beset ones to the top, then have the results quickly integrate with an external word processing product: That way I'm essentially taking the RSS-MXL-products/information and forcing it to interact seamlessly with an external software product like Excel, PowerPoint, or word. Plus, it would be nice if I could quickly transport the summary argument table, and quickly-simultaneously have the links go with that information in some sort of format that I define for footnoting, citation, or cross references.


-- This is the end of the content --
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