25 September 2006

Interactive Landscape 3-D Feeds

Ever notice behind large vans the TV displays passengers are watching? Some of them have games.

Then I got to thinking: What if the game could leave the screen.

Ever seen one of those head-up displays: They point to things on the ground. Same concept here.

For your son or daughter's birthday, they get an X-BOX-like toy, but instead of the toy moving around on the screen, the toy jumps around on your car windows. The driver can't see them.

But imagine this: Instead of just relying on the game developer's imagination, what if the game could actually appear to interact with the surrounding environment.

To your left and right are cow pastures. Then, on the horizon . . . there it is. A windmill. Your son or daughter directs the game-piece to race up the ladder of the water tower, then grabs onto the windmill, and gets flung into the sky, and then pulls out a parachute, and appears to land on the care on the other side of the freeway. Then the game pieces starts to jump from car to car, back toward your car, and climbs on the roof, and pokes its head into the window like Kilroy.

I don't know about you, but there are some really strange things you can think about driving across Siberia. It starts to looks the same, unless your games start making it look different.

The moutains are lovely.


-- This is the end of the content --
Ever notice behind large vans the TV displays passengers are watching? Some of them have games.

Then I got to thinking: What if the game could leave the screen.

Ever seen one of those head-up displays: They point to things on the ground. Same concept here.

For your son or daughter's birthday, they get an X-BOX-like toy, but instead of the toy moving around on the screen, the toy jumps around on your car windows. The driver can't see them.

But imagine this: Instead of just relying on the game developer's imagination, what if the game could actually appear to interact with the surrounding environment.

To your left and right are cow pastures. Then, on the horizon . . . there it is. A windmill. Your son or daughter directs the game-piece to race up the ladder of the water tower, then grabs onto the windmill, and gets flung into the sky, and then pulls out a parachute, and appears to land on the care on the other side of the freeway. Then the game pieces starts to jump from car to car, back toward your car, and climbs on the roof, and pokes its head into the window like Kilroy.

I don't know about you, but there are some really strange things you can think about driving across Siberia. It starts to looks the same, unless your games start making it look different.

The moutains are lovely.


-- This is the end of the content --
" />